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Reduction of Consumption Poverty

Welcome to CENFACS’ Online Diary!

30 September 2020

 

Post No. 163

 

 

 

The Week’s Contents

 

• To be Launched this Autumn 2020: Autumn Humanitarian Relief Appeal 2020

• Poverty Reduction Goals Project – Goal No. 2: Reduction of Consumption Poverty

• Coming this October 2020: Making Memorable Difference Project

 

… and much more!

 

 

 

Key Messages

 

• To be Launched this Autumn 2020: Autumn Humanitarian Relief Appeal 2020

 

Our humanitarian appeal for Autumn 2020 will be soon launched this October 2020 and will be live on the Support Us page of this website at cenfacs.org.uk/support-us/

This appeal is about supporting needy people, flora, fauna, communities and organisations in Africa.  It will include the following five selected projects: 

1/ Skills for Building Back Better

2/ Symmetry Project

3/ Gender into Covid-19 Economic Recovery in Africa

4/ Back-to-School Support

5/ Save Flora and Fauna projects

A brief summary of these projects will be posted on the same page Support Us (http://cenfacs.org.uk/supporting-us/) of this website. 

The full project proposals of each project making this appeal will be available should any of the potential donor or funder makes a request. 

Donors and funders can directly and respectively donate or fund these projects. 

A message about this appeal can also be passed on to a person who is in a position and willing to support.  Many thanks to those who will be passing this message!

We understand that the world is experiencing an extremely difficult time with the coronavirus pandemic which has enormously disrupted the functioning of many economies, including the ability of people to support good and deserving causes. 

The effects of this health crisis are even stronger in place where there is a high level of poverty like in Africa.  This is why we will be launching this seasonal appeal to help not only to reduce poverty but also to save lives from the coronavirus disaster.

Once this appeal is live, we are inviting those who can to donate £2 to create 2 benefits (1 benefit for humans and 1 benefit for other natural livings) or any amount starting from £2 or more as you wish. 

You can gift aid your donation as well as support these projects in a way that is the most suitable and related to your situation, capacity and willingness.

To donate, gift aid and support otherwise; please contact CENFACS.

 

 

 

 

• Poverty Reduction Goals Project – Goal No. 2: Reduction of Consumption Poverty

 

This week, we are starting the implementation process of our 2020s Poverty Reduction Programme and Development Agenda.  We are doing it through Poverty Reduction Goal 2, which is Reduction of Consumption Poverty.

Indeed, poverty comes in all shapes and sizes.  One of the types of poverty that people experience is the one related to the lack or insufficient consumption both in quality and quantity.  In our 2020s Poverty Reduction Programme and Development Agenda, we will be working with local organisations and people to improve ways of reducing poverty linked to consumption while taking stock about the work which has been undertaken so far. 

Under the Main Development section of this post, we have provided more information about Goal 2 of our 2020s Programme and Agenda; information which we are inviting you to read and share.

 

 

 

• Coming this October 2020: Making Memorable Difference Project

In Focus: History of African Sculpture and Representation of Historical African Figures of the Pre-independence Era (Period before the 1960s)

 

Let us first start by defining sculpture in order to make sense of what is the focus of Making Memorable Difference (MMD) Project.  Using Chambers’ Concise Dictionary (1), it says that sculpture is

“the art or act of carving or modelling with clay, wood, stone, plaster, etc.” (p. 1108)

Sculpture can help in understanding history or just the past.  It can as well help us to build imagination and represent better those who made the African world in which many Africans are living in today. 

Through the MMD Project, we shall try to identify history makers or historical figures of the pre-independence era in Africa.  Some of these people, who could be called historical figures and have their recognised place in our memory for the difference they made in their time and for the legacies they left which are being celebrated today, will be remembered during the two days of the delivery of MMD Project.   

So, as part of our Season of Autumn of Building Back Better Africa, we will be working on way of building back better the African sculpture and the Historical African Figures of the Pre-independence Era.  To do that one may need to reassess the contribution of these figures while comparing the pre-independence to post-independence/democratic periods of the 21st Century.  

The above is just a brief about the theme of this year’s MMD Project.  For any enquiries about this brief or any other information, please do not hesitate to contact CENFACS.

 

 

 

Extra Messages

 

• Individual Capacity Development Activity: Application of the Model of Change Curve

 

As part of our Individual Capacity Development Activity in this Autumn of Acceptance and Integration, we are asking to those who can to apply the model of change curve by Elizabeth Kübler-Ross (2) at their personal and individual level. 

The purpose of this exercise is to use the two stages (acceptance and integration) from her 5 stages model to try to look at the possibility of accepting and integrating the effects of the coronavirus shock into their work/life balance. 

One can hope that by doing the exercise this can help them in the process of building back better from the ill or side effects of the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent lockdowns. 

We are as well asking to those who may have done or will do this acceptance and integration exercise to share their outcomes or experiences. 

To discuss any issue regarding these requests related to the Individual Capacity Development Activity, please contact CENFACS.

 

 

 

• Back to the Upkeep of the Nature with the Theme of “Blue Spaces”: What to take away

 

Our three weeks activity on the “Blue Spaces” is now over.  However, we shall continue to work and campaign on issues related to the “Blue Spaces” as part of our conservation and heritage areas of work.

Following on the “Blue Spaces” theme, we would like to share with you these three takeaways:

(1) There is a need to develop or improve the model of working together with local people through the “Blue Spaces

(2) Both poverty reduction and sustainable development can be blue

(3) Maintaining healthy relationships between any human efforts to reduce poverty and “Blue Spaces” can help to conserve the blue biodiversity.

As part of the monitoring and evaluation process of the “Blue Spaces” theme, we would like you to give us your views on the three notes related to this theme and your own experience of the “Blue Spaces” in terms of poverty reduction and sustainable development.

Thank you for your support.

 

 

 

• Virtual Open Day and Hours (VODHs) End but Advice Service Continues…

 

Our September Month of Advice-giving Sessions (of VODHs) ends today.  However, our advice service will continue as advice is part of the service we provide. 

For those who need advice and who could not contact us on the day (every Fridays of September 2020) and hours (between 10am and 2pm), they can still seek advice online, 24 hours and 7 days a week.

 

To request advice and or any other services (such as Basic Community Support, Consume to Reduce Poverty, Bridging Financial Information Gap), please have a look at http://cenfacs.org.uk/services-activities/

 

We would like to take this opportunity to thank those who contacted us for advice and or made enquiries about our other services. 

Need advice; please do not hesitate to contact CENFACS.

 

 

 

 

Main Development

 

Poverty Reduction Goals Project – Goal No. 2: Reduction of Consumption Poverty

 

Reduction of Consumption Poverty is one of the seven goals making CENFACS’ 2020s Poverty Reduction Programme and Development Agenda.  Before looking at this second goal of our 2020s Poverty Reduction Programme and Development Agenda, let us define those who are called consumption poor.

 

• • Who is consumption poor?

 

Referring to the resource provided by the website www.borgenmanagerial.com (3), it is possible to argue that consumption poor are

“those who live or may be living above the income poverty line but spend the majority of their income on food or health care, rendering them unable to afford proper housing”.

Bearing in mind that the value of the international standard is $3.20 a day, this definition could be disputable.  However, it provides some insights to the understanding of consumption poor as well as it can help to measure consumption poverty at individual and household levels.  

Consumption poverty can as well be better understood by using various quantitative and qualitative measures.  One of the many measures or indicators used multilateral agencies is the Prevalence of Undernourishment. 

For instance, in a collective publication by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations and other multilateral agencies (4), they argue that

“By 2030, the projected rise in the Prevalence of Undernourishment (PoU) would bring the number of hungry people in Africa to almost 433 million, 412 of whom would be in Sub-Saharan countries” (p. 10)

They further claim in the same publication that

“Africa has the highest PoU and the second highest number of undernourished people, accounting for 36.4 per cent of the global total” (p. 15)

With the current health and economic crisis caused by the coronavirus pandemic, the PoU could increase just as the number of consumption poor in Africa could be higher than what any estimate may provide.

Once one understands or defines consumption poverty and its measures, they can then try to do something about it.  One way of doing something is to tackle or reduce it.

 

• • Reduction of consumption poverty

 

It is possible to decrease or end the state of lacking money and or material possessions in order to use available resources to satisfy one’s wants or needs.   In simple terms, consumption poverty can be tackled, reduced and ended.

Tackling any types of poverty (including consumption poverty) implies dealing with its root causes, improving way of measuring it through consumption-based poverty index or indicators and developing a strategy or plan of action to deal with it. 

In the case of CENFACS, we have developed the 2020s Development Agenda and Poverty Reduction Programme in terms of framework of action.  

 

• • • CENFACS’ 2020s Development Agenda

 

The 2020s Development Agenda is a series of processes and tools defining the 2020s development framework that will enable CENFACS deliver its poverty reduction goals.

It is indeed a summary and coherent list of the issues and challenges that poor people are facing in 2020 and will face throughout the 2020s; issues and challenges that need to be addressed in order to reduce and end poverty in Africa.  These issues and challenges will shape the kind of poverty reduction work CENFACS will do with its Africa-based Sister Organisations and local people. 

 

• • • CENFACS’ 2020s Poverty Reduction Programme (C2020sPRP)

 

C2020sPRP, which is a group of related projects and activities organised in a coordinated way to reduce and possibly end poverty, aims at identifying and reaching out to extremely poor and help them out of poverty through sustainable development means.

The programme, which has a ten year vision to change lives, has a long term poverty reduction commitment and various phases or tranches while aiming at achieving collective benefits or outcomes of the projects and activities making it. 

The programme, which is a collection or package of projects and activities, has been under the responsibility of a programme manager inside CENFACS to ensure that the overall goal of poverty reduction is delivered and preserved.

The programme, which reflects our knowledge and experience of poverty in Africa and the UK, is not an end itself but an open dialogue with those in need and CENFACS’ stakeholders in continuing to search for solutions about the current, new and emerging problems of poverty in the era of a changing climate and in the new Age of the coronavirus pandemic.

The programme, which is a renewed commitment with CENFACS’ stakeholders, plans to share good practice in poverty reduction and sustainable development in innovative ways while seeking to develop knowledge, research and skills within the CENFACS community.

In order to achieve the overall aim of the programme, the programme has been equipped with some goals, targets and indicators so that we know the direction of travel we are taking, whether or not we are reaching our fixed objective and how we can measure what we are doing.

In practical terms, it means breaking down this programme and each goal into specific targets or objectives.  This is what we are trying to do with Goal number 2 of this programme, which is the “Reduction of Consumption Poverty”.

 

• • Objectives related to the goal of reduction of consumption poverty

 

This goal covers the following objectives:

√ Improvement of access to anti-poverty programmes in the area of consumption for Africa-based Sister Organisations (ASOs) and their beneficiaries

√ Tackling the lack of ownership of durable goods that many of their users are experiencing

√ Enhancement of access and availability of resources for consumption poor people

√ Developing means for them to create their own savings while making better use of these savings

√ Ensuring they consume sustainably, safely and healthily

The above are the kinds of targets or objectives that stemmed from the consultations we had with our ASOs and local people; targets that everyone invested in these consultations wish them to reach by the end of the 2020s. 

However, due to circumstances and factors that may be uncontrollable (like the coronavirus pandemic and climate change), it is better to be moderate and cautious in terms of any ambition to reach these objectives.  Also, ten years or so are so many years to go and many things can happen. 

Nonetheless, if one wants to reduce poverty and do development, they need to have a plan of action on how they are going to go about it.  It could be a one month, one year, five years or ten years, etc.  They must have something beforehand. 

One could hope that by the end of the 2020s, these objectives could be reached.  Like in any agenda and programme of action, there will be monitoring, evaluation, reviews and progress assessment as we go along to make sure that this goal 2 is on track as well as the entire 2020s Poverty Reduction Programme and Development Agenda.    

For any enquiries or queries about this programme and or the Goal 2, please contact CENFACS.

_________

(1) Chambers Concise Dictionary © Chambers Harrap Publishers Ltd 2009 (www.chambers.co.uk)

(2) Kübler-Ross E., 1969: On Death and Dying, New York: Simon and Schuster, Inc.

(3) https://www.borgenmagazine.com/the-best-way-to-measure-poverty/

(4) FAO, IFAD, UNICEF, WFP and WHO, 2020: The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World 2020 – Transforming food systems for affordable healthy diets.  Rome, FAO (https://doi.org/10.4060/ca9692en)

 

Help CENFACS keep the Poverty Relief work going in 2020.

We do our work on a very small budget and on a voluntary basis.  Making a donation will show us you value our work and support CENFACS’ work, which is currently offered as a free service. 

One could consider a recurring donation to CENFACS in the future.

Donate to support CENFACS!

 

FOR ONLY £1, YOU CAN SUPPORT CENFACS AND CENFACS’ PROJECTS, JUST GO TO http://cenfacs.org.uk/supporting-us/

Thank you for visiting CENFACS website and reading this post.

Thank you as well to those who made or make comments about our weekly posts.

We look forward to receiving your regular visits and continuing support throughout 2020 and beyond.

With many thanks.

 

 

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Autumn Help to Build Back Better

Welcome to CENFACS’ Online Diary!

23 September 2020

 

Post No. 162

 

 

The Week’s Contents

 

• Autumn Help to Build Back Better

• Build Back Better Fauna and Flora

• Back to the Upkeep of the Nature, In Focus for Week Beginning 21/09/2020: The Place of the “Blue Spaces” in Sustainable Development in Africa

 

… and much more! 

 

 

Key Messages

 

• Autumn Fresh Start Help and Resources

 

Autumn Fresh Start Help normally strikes or kicks off our Autumn programme.  It is our Autumn project striker.  Autumn Fresh Start Help and Resources are made of fresh start skills, tips, hints, tweaks, hacks, etc.  These are help and resources designed to overcome poverty and hardships. 

However, we explained last week that this year’s Autumn within CENFACS may not be about Freshness or Fresh Start due to the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent lockdowns.  Instead, it would be about Acceptance and Integration to Build Back Better.

Despite that the title of our Autumn ICDP (Individual Capacity Development Programme) resource known as Fresh Autumn Start will remain unchanged.  But, the focus for this year’s Issue of this resource will be on Building Back Better.  For this year, our Autumn project striker is Autumn Help to Build Back Better.

 

• • Fresh Autumn Start (FAS) resources

 

Autumn Help to Build Back Better comes with Fresh Autumn Start (FAS) resources.  The highlights of the 2020 Edition of FAS is within the context of the Pandemic Year. 

Our keywords for this Autumn are acceptance and integration to build back better.  The context in which we will be using these key words is of the dominance of the coronavirus pandemic over 2020.

Further details about these key words and contextual framework are given below under the Main Development section of this post.

 

• • Advice-giving as part of Autumn Fresh Start Help and Resources

 

Our advice-giving month of September continues as planned and will end next month.  Advice-giving is also part of our Autumn Fresh Start Help and Resources.  Although we put particular emphasis on advice-giving activity in our September engagement, other aspects of Autumn Fresh Start or striker are also important and will continue beyond September.

To ask for Help to Build Back Better and or access Fresh Start Resources, just contact CENFACS.

 

 

• Build Back Better Flora and Fauna (BBBFF)

 

In the process of Building Back Better from the Covid-19 disaster, one should make sure that the other living beings are not left behind.  This attention to other beings (like plants and animals) should be done; although during lockdowns some positive data have been recorded showing, for example the reduction of pollution in some cities, the decrease in noise and human traffic (including motor traffic, aircraft, etc.).  

BBBFF is one of our Starting XI Projects.  Through this Starting Project, we are continuing to advocate for the protection of animals in Africa and elsewhere in developing world whereby animals get killed, traded and extinct to such extent that some species are at the brink of disappearing. 

Our fauna advocacy aims at dealing with ways of tackling the threats to survival in the wild facing by the world’s big cats (such as lion, tiger, leopard, jaguar, cheetah, snow leopard, puma, clouded leopard, etc.), the world’s majestic animals and symbols of power and courage.

Animals such as jaguars, tigers, elephants, snakes, alligators, rhinoceroses, etc. are under threat.  There are several reasons about it which include: hunting, illicit and illegal trade, over-harvesting, habitat loss, climate change, poaching, etc.

CENFACS’ Build Back Better Animals or Fauna advocacy is to advocate for the enhancement of protection of endangered, threatened and vulnerable species. 

In this process, we are as well interested in efforts made to protect animals from diseases including the coronavirus.  For example, people can still remember how tuberculosis killed elephants in South Africa, a few years ago. 

We are as well extending our advocacy to other species in danger like trees, plans and flowers (flora).  It is a two scopes campaign of Building Back Better Fauna and FloraThis year’s advocacy for flora and fauna will include two actions:

(1) Action to integrate Covid-19 restrictions into the flora and fauna advocacy

This action is about following and applying to letter the health advice and restrictions with regard to plants and animals as far as Covid-19 is concerned.

(2) Actions to recovery, rehabilitation and reconstruction  

This action is about making sure that, plants and animals regain, restore and rebuild their lives.

Building Back Better Fauna and Flora is only an iceberg of the wide natural creature protection campaign. 

CENFACS’ Build Back Better Fauna and Flora is run this week until the last week of September 2020 and will be soon after followed by our Autumn environmental umbrella campaign, “A la une” (Autumn Leaves of Action to Upkeep the Nature in Existence) project. 

“A la une”will take Build Back Better Fauna and Flora advocacy to the other level of environmental communications.  It will focus on the Restoration of Ecological Infrastructures in Africa.

To advocate and raise your voice to build back better endangered species, contact CENFACS.

 

 

 

• Back to the Upkeep of the Nature, In Focus for Week Beginning 21/09/2020: The Place of the “Blue Spaces” in Sustainable Development in Africa

   

This is the last note of our “Blue Spaces” theme.  In this last note, we are dealing with the Place of the “Blue Spaces” in Sustainable Development in Africa.

The “Blue Spaces” have a role to play and a place to occupy in sustainable development.  Indeed, many people and communities depend for their livelihoods on the biodiversity from the “Blue Spaces” and their surrounding environment.  Also, the “Blue Spaces” can absorb carbon dioxide. 

In the above circumstances, it is pointless to argue that the “Blue Spaces” play a vital role and have an important place in sustainable development in Africa and elsewhere.  It is not a surprise that the United Nations made life below water as its sustainable development goal no. 14 as part of the Agenda 2030. 

To maintain the place and role of the “Blue Spaces” in sustainable development in Africa and elsewhere, there is a need to protect them from land-based pollution and unsustainable use of resources from them.  This protection should be in times of peace and war. 

It is possible to aim at a model of poverty reduction and development that is non-polluting and not reliant on unsustainable use of natural resources from the “Blue Spaces”.  It is as well possible to work together to make sure that Blue Sustainable Development is preserved in our fight against the coronavirus pandemic; a sustainable development model that is “Blue Spaces” friendly. 

To support this note and/or the all “Blue Spaces” theme or to get information about it, please contact CENFACS.

 

 

 

Extra Messages

 

• Capacity Development in Building Back Better

 

Some people can easily restart life after a shock like the coronavirus pandemic.   Others can manage their working life and take new initiatives at the start of a new season and after returning from the Covid-19 lockdown.  Other more may struggle or find it difficult to resume their activity or simply may take such a long time to restart since they had a long period of economic inactivity during the lockdown.

 

• • Capacity is needed to build back better from the Covid-19 disaster

 

As part of back-to-relief programme, we are looking forward to working with people in need to redevelop their capacity to build back better.  To build back better, it requires a certain level of capacity, especially as we are in a situation whereby certain capacities have been destroyed and some people are coming from economic inactivity due to the coronavirus pandemic and lockdowns.  Likewise, more people can go back to economic inactivity if the coronavirus spikes increase.

To enable them to have a smooth return or transition as the economies are starting the work of rehabilitation, restoration and reconstruction, it makes sense to have their capacity maintained and redeveloped.

 

• • What is capacity development to build back better?

 

This is a set of Autumn support made of fresh start essentials.  It is a process through which their capacity (that is their ability to perform functions of fresh start life is re-established or redeveloped) is recreated.  This process includes fresh start skills, knowledge and resources.  This redevelopment of capacity will go beyond their specific area of work to include capacity in some areas of health protection since the world is still battling against Covid-19. 

To enquire about Capacity Development to Build Back Better, please contact CENFACS.

 

 

• African Poverty Reduction Movements in the Era of Covid-19

How African Poverty Reduction Movements can identify themselves in the battle against the coronavirus pandemic

 

Under CENFACS’ be.africa Forum, we are discussing the future development of poverty reduction movements (like the protest movements in Algeria).  Our discussion is about the link between poverty reduction movements, poor people and African organisations in Africa.  During this week’s discussions, we shall revisit the current and previous poverty reduction movements while having an outlook in terms of their prospects in terms of their contribution to poverty reduction and sustainable development in Africa.

This week, we are working on the interaction between the three entities, particularly on how the link between them can reshape outcomes about poverty reduction and sustainable development for poor people, where these movements take place in Africa in the era of the coronavirus pandemic.  Our discussion will indeed be about how these movements identify them in the battle against Covid-19 while keeping the integrity of their agendas about poverty reduction and sustainable development working according plans.      

To join and or add your input to this Autumn discussion, please contact CENFACS.

 

 

• Mission Year and Advice-giving Month

 

CENFACS’ 2020 Mission Year is a coordinated plan by CENFACS to provide what is needed and necessary to support any efforts of poverty reduction.  In the context of Advice-giving Month, it is about linking this mission with the need to work together with vulnerable people and communities so that they can access life-protecting and –saving advice during this Autumn and beyond.

Working with local people to have appropriate choice of activities to reduce poverty and hardships will be the kinds of Mission we are having this month.  It is about working with them to find advice service and activities that are relevant to their needs of poverty reduction and sustainable development.  This is because not all types of advice can gear towards poverty reduction and sustainable development.   

The link between the Mission Year and Advice-giving Month is finally expressed in our efforts to help people and communities to help themselves to reduce poverty while working with them to access relevant advisory recipes to build back better from the adverse impacts caused by the Covid-19.

To enquire about how CENFACS will implement its mission and advice service at the same time, please contact CENFACS.

 

 

 

 

Main Development 

 

Autumn Help to Build Back Better

            

• • What is Fresh Autumn Start (FAS)

 

FAS is a continuation of our Summer Support projects into the Autumn season.  It is a building block or additional back up of useful survival tips and hints to embrace Autumn as smoothly and trouble-freely as possible. 

It includes real life situations that users may face when and as they return from their Summer Break or season on one hand, and possible leads to proffer solutions to their arising Autumn needs on the other hand.

This FAS resource is not exhaustive or an end itself.  It has to be completed with other resources.  It is a good basic insight into a Fresh Start as it provides helpful advisory tools for a Fresh Start and confidence building for the rest of the Autumn season.  It could also be used as a reference for users to engineer their own idea of Fresh Start and the sustained management of autumn needs. 

The focus for this year’s FAS is on Building Back Better.  This focus was carefully chosen after considering what happened during this Summer with the coronavirus and subsequent lockdowns.  It has been agreed to focus on supporting beneficiaries to build back better after the effects of Covid-19 and lockdown rather than just expecting them to come back from the lockdown to freshly start as if no major crisis happened during Summer 2020.

At the end of this resource, there are some websites addresses or directories for help and support.  These sources of help and support are not exhaustive.  We have mainly considered third sector organisations and service providers as well as social enterprises. 

For further or extended list of service providers for your Autumn needs, one can contact their local authorities and service directories (both online and print).

 

• • The Focus of Fresh Autumn Start 2020 Edition

 

This Autumn, we are approaching Fresh Start Help from the perspective of building back better.   We know that Covid-19 is not over and the battle against it continues.  There is a probability for coronavirus spikes.  This is why we argued a case about a Sinusoidal Autumn, whereby there could be rises followed by decreases (and vice versa) of the epidemiological curves (epi-curves) of the coronavirus during this Autumn. 

However, since the economies are doing the work of rehabilitation, recovery and reconstruction; we too are trying to find our way to help those in need in starting to build back better while prudently shadowing the stages of coronavirus outbreak or the evolution of the epi-curves of the coronavirus pandemic.    

Throughout this Autumn, we will try to work with beneficiaries in helping them to meet their basic life-sustaining needs of building back better in the context of the sinusoidal Autumn due to the persisting effects of the coronavirus pandemic.  We will as well work with them on the model of change they may embrace in terms of acceptance and integration of the effects of the coronavirus shock.  This will mostly be at individual level to meet individual needs after the first shock of Covid-19 while keeping an eye on any erupting effects of any probable shock waves of the Covid-19 during this Autumn.

So, Fresh Autumn Start will deal with the needs to build back better from the first Covid-19 shock, subsequent lockdown and any potential shock waves from Covid-19 this Autumn and beyond.

 

• • Key summaries of the contents of FAS 2020 Edition

 

The contents for 2020 Edition of Fresh Autumn Start (FAS) include:

• Autumn scenarios and actions to take

• Examples of Summer Break Expenses Track Record and Autumn Build-Back-Better Budget

• People needs and Autumn leads

• Integration of threats

• What you can get from CENFACS

• Autumn online and digital resources

 

• • • Possible Autumn Scenarios and Possible Actions

 

When returning from Summer Break and/or season or coronavirus-induced lockdown, people can find themselves in a variety of situations depending on their own individual circumstances and life experiences.  This variety of situations may require or be expected to be matched with a diversity of responses in order to meet people’s Autumn needs.  These variable circumstances and diverse responses or a course of actions can take the different shapes as well as can be framed in order to take into account the adverse impacts of climate change.

 

• • • Examples of Summer Break Expenses Track Record and Autumn Build-Back-Better Budget

 

Tracking down and reassessing summer break/season expenses is a positive step to put one through a positive start for the Autumn season.  As part of this positive step, FAS is packed with an example of Summer Break Expenses Track Record.

Budgeting Autumn items and needs is also good for a Fresh Start and for overall control over the start and rest of autumn season expenses.  Since our focus is on build back better, one can write a build back better budget.  Such a budget will help in costing the activities planned in the process of building back better.

To support this financial control, FAS contains two examples of budgets: Autumn build back better budget and fresh start budget.   

 

• • • People’s Needs and Autumn Leads 

               

Variable circumstances can obviously result in multiple needs.  One of these circumstances is the exceptional conditions of Covid-19 and lockdowns.  To meet those needs, we may have to gather resources, tools and institutions to guide us.  The 2020 Edition of FAS provides a table that gives an idea of the likely leads to satisfy people’s needs or just to guide them.

 

• • • Integrating the threats from the adverse impacts of various factors into FAS

 

The particularity of FAS 2020 edition is that it integrates the life-threatening impacts of the coronavirus and the probable adverse impacts of climate change.  This integration is at the levels of possible Autumn scenarios, Autumn budget and arising needs.  It is the integration of both life-sustaining needs and life-threatening impacts of the coronavirus and climate change. 

 

• • • What You Can Get from CENFACS in Autumn under Autumn Help to Build Back Better

 

The set of help provided in the FAS 2020 to Build Back Better is part of CENFACS’ UK arm of services and additional services we set up to overcome the negative effects of the coronavirus and lockdown.  Besides that it further takes into account specific needs of people that may require specialist organisations and or institutions to deal with them.  In which case CENFACS can signpost or refer the applicants to those third parties.

We hope that the basic tips and hints making the contents of FAS 2020 Edition will help you in some aspects of your Autumn needs.

Wishing you a Safe and Healthy Autumn season, and good work of Building Back Better!

 

Help CENFACS keep the Poverty Relief work going in 2020.

We do our work on a very small budget and on a voluntary basis.  Making a donation will show us you value our work and support CENFACS’ work, which is currently offered as a free service. 

One could consider a recurring donation to CENFACS in the future.

Donate to support CENFACS!

 

FOR ONLY £1, YOU CAN SUPPORT CENFACS AND CENFACS’ PROJECTS, JUST GO TO http://cenfacs.org.uk/supporting-us/

Thank you for visiting CENFACS website and reading this post.

Thank you as well to those who made or make comments about our weekly posts.

We look forward to receiving your regular visits and continuing support throughout 2020 and beyond.

With many thanks.

 

 

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XI Projects to Build Back Better plus Getting Involved!

Welcome to CENFACS’ Online Diary!

16 September 2020

 

Post No. 161

 

 

The Week’s Contents

 

• Autumn of Building Back Better

• Autumn Programme with XI Projects to Build Back Better

• Back-to-the Upkeep of the Nature with the “Blue Spaces”

 

… and much more!

 

 

 

Key Messages

 

• Autumn of Building Back Better

 

Normally, Autumn is the season of Freshness or Fresh Start within CENFACS.  It is the season after the long sunny weather and break of Summer most of our beneficiaries return back to freshly restart. 

This year, because of the coronavirus pandemic and its continuing adverse effects we cannot simply assume that everybody can easily restart this Autumn.  The all Summer has been about healthiness issues.  There are many members of our community who have been seriously affected by the coronavirus pandemic and the lockdown.  There are even families whose children have not yet returned to school due the Covid-19 effects.  These effects on them have changed the nature of Autumn. 

 

• • The Changing Nature of the Autumn Season: Freshness to Building Back   

 

We have started to see a sinusoidal pattern in the coronavirus pandemic.  After having a short period of decrease of the coronavirus pandemic, there are now rises in some parts of the world including in Europe.  This pattern could mean some oscillations in people’s activities as well.

Because of this sinusoidal trend or the sine wave of the coronavirus pandemic, we are refraining ourselves to call this Autumn of Freshness or Fresh Start.  Instead, we will call this Autumn of Building Back as it will be of working together with our local people to build back better from the side effects of the coronavirus and lockdowns. 

We are going to work together to build back where they were before the coronavirus pandemic struck, and where possible, we will strive to build back better.  Therefore, the key words and phrases for our sharing and engaging contents over this Autumn are Sinusoid (or sine wave) and Build Back Better which will underpin all our works over this period.

 

• • Sinusoidal Autumn 2020 of Building Back Better

 

This Autumn could be a sinusoidal one at the start while hoping that at the end it could become of restoration.  Nobody knows the number of oscillations that may happen.  The entire waveform may shift in time to become linear by the end, in which case one could think of sign of recovery or restoration.

As the facts speak for themselves (with the recent increase in the number of Covid-19 infected cases), we can speculate that there could be rises and decreases in the number of infected persons.  This can only affect people’s Autumn life, happiness and work.  One can hope that there could be some signs of calming by the end of Autumn 2020. 

In meantime, we will work together to help build back lives while shadowing the evolution of the epidemiological curves (“epi-curves”) of the coronavirus pandemic.  One needs to be positive about the future if they want to help reduce poverty without ignoring the reality of the coronavirus pandemic.  As mentioned earlier, our Autumn will be of Building Back, and where possible of Building Back Better

 

• • Autumn 2020 of Acceptance and Integration

 

One can assume that this Autumn will be in a sine wave.  By referring to the 1960s theory of the five stages of grief or model of change curve by Elizabeth Kübler-Ross (1), it is possible to argue that after the Covid-19 shock, some of our people would be in a position where they could accept that change is inevitable, and they could return to where they were before the coronavirus with changes rather than against them.  After they experienced isolation (or self-isolation) and remoteness due to the lockdowns, they may need some levels of support to be maintained to return to an earlier stage.  By looking at again the Elizabeth Kübler-Ross model, one can sum up by saying that this Autumn is of Acceptance and Integration at individual and people’s levels.

For more details about the features of Autumn 2020 within CENFACS, please do not hesitate to contact us.

 

(1) Kübler-Ross E., 1969: On Death and Dying, New York: Simon and Schuster, Inc.

 

• Autumn Programme with XI Projects to Build Back Better

 

Before talking about the Autumn XI Projects, let us clarify the concepts of Build Back Better.  From the body of literature we consulted, we have chosen this terminology from the United Nations General Assembly 2016 (2) which says that 

“Build Back Better (BBB) is the use of the recovery, rehabilitation and reconstruction phases after a disaster to increase the resilience of nations and communities through integrating disaster risk reduction measures into the restoration of physical infrastructure and societal systems, and into the revitalization of livelihoods, economies, and the environment”.

From this definition, we can argue that our Autumn 2020 will be about recovering, rehabilitation and reconstruction with the CENFACS Community and our Africa-based Sister Organisations.   To proceed with this post-coronavirus disaster work, we have selected the projects listed below.

 

Recover, Rehabilitate and Reconstruct with Build-Back-Better Projects from the Autumn 2020 Essential Programme

 

Autumn of Building Back Better is about working together with our users and stakeholders through helpful collection of Build Back Better projects blended together to give a new seasoned leaf of relief during Autumn 2020.  These projects implement new and improved ways of working with local people to meet changing need mainly led by the persisting adverse effects of the coronavirus pandemic. 

The Autumn 2020 Essential Programme is made of 

1/ Build Back Better Skills, Tips, Hints, Tweaks and Hacks 

2/ Transformative experiences  

3/ The Season’s appeal to stand up again against poverty and hardships  

4/ A Slice of Africa’s history 

5/ Build Back thoughts and inspirations for a Coronavirus-free poverty relief and development agenda 

All this is flavoured with hopes, dreams and reasons to believe in the future; a poverty-free, sustainable and coronavirus-free world. 

So, the line up for CENFACS’ Build Back XI Projects (or Build Back Better Projects) for this Autumn is as follows:

(1) Women, Children and Coronavirus Talks Day

(2) Poverty Reduction Goals Project: Goal No. 2 – NEW

(3) Ecology and Sanitation Advocacy – NEW

(4) Health Economics for the Poor – NEW

(5) Build Back Better Flora and Fauna

(6) Making Memorable Difference

(7) A la Une (Autumn Leaves of Action for the Upkeep of the Nature in Existence)

(8) Essentia project – NEW

(9) Help to Build Back Better

(10) Covid-19 Campaign 

(11) Autumn Humanitarian Relief Appeal

For more on these projects, read below under the Main Developments section of this post.

 

 

 

 

• Back-to-the Upkeep of the Nature with the “Blue Spaces”

In Focus for Week beginning 14/09/2020: The Contribution of the “Blue Spaces” to Poverty Reduction

 

There are many ways which show that the “Blue Spaces” contribute to the reduction of poverty in Africa and elsewhere.  This contribution could come from water itself as a natural resource making a particular blue space (e.g. river, lake, canal, fountain, etc.) and other resources or wealth containing in blue spaces (such as fish, plants, minerals, etc.).

To understand that we are going to give a counter example of the Lake Chad in Africa that experienced drought due to the global warming and climate change.  This drought or lack of enough water in this lake had terrible consequences for those poor whose living has been dependent on the Lake Chad and its wealth.  This drought has affected the entire Lake Chad Basin.

There are countless examples which demonstrate that the “Blue Spaces” contribute to the reduction of poverty and hardships.  At this exceptional time of the coronavirus pandemic, where there have been travel restrictions on land, the “Blue Spaces” were an opportunity to those living nearby to access water resources to meet basic needs to maintain life and survive during this crisis.

So, through this week’s note on the theme of “Blue Spaces”, we can take stock of the first note, exchange knowledge and look forward in the process of making the “Blue Spaces” work for the poor and the neediest.  We can keep blue poverty relief working.

To add your input and or enquire about this second note, please contact CENFACS.    

 

 

 

Extra Messages

 

• Starting or Renewing your Involvement with CENFACS’ Work

 

The beginning of every season is an opportunity either to continue to do the things we always do as they work or to think of taking on new initiatives in the new season or to do both.  Likewise, in times of crisis like the coronavirus pandemic there are not only threats and losses; there are as well opportunities to do things differently.  One can use the opportunity of this health crisis to change things.  There are many ways in which one can build back better this Autumn.

For example, one can use the opportunity of the current health and rethink on the types of organisations and projects they support.  One may find appropriate to start or increase or even reduce their support to a particular development cause.  One could also think of getting involved in CENFACS’ work or renewing their commitment to it if they have ever got involved in it before.  The decision is theirs.

Below we have spelled out various ways in which one can enhance CENFACS’ cause and make a useful impact on poverty alleviation with us.

 

 

• International Advice Service: Health Check Service Promotion!

 

As part of our International Advice Service, we are having a promotion this week.  We are holding advice sessions on Health Check for African organisations under the Back-to-relief Programme. 

The purpose of this health check is to detect critical issues to improve the performance of Africa-based Sister Organisations, especially as many of them have been affected by the impacts of the coronavirus pandemic.  Through these advisory sessions, there is a possibility to achieve the following:

√ Update organisational programmes of work

√ Track the traffic of services and activities

√ Clean up organisations’ processes and operations by removing malfunctions

√ Update organisations’ settings and fix problems

√ Track e-income streams

√ Tap into the coronavirus finance packages in the international funding market

Etc.

Need health check or general advice; please do not hesitate to take this week’s promotion from CENFACS.

 

 

• Data Analytics about All-Year Round Projects, Triple Value Initiatives (Play, Run and Vote projects)

 

Generally these projects are run separately.  In this Autumn, as part of data tracking we are continuing to study the relationship between the three of them.  To do that, we will be tracking data about them, especially from those who have managed to undertake the three of them.  So, the aim of this data tracking exercise is to combine data about them to generate an increased or add-on relief against poverty and hardships.  In doing so, we will be able to discover if there are some interactions or correlations between them.  Our analysis will not stop there, we will as well study the patterns in data collected and treated.

For further details about this data tracking and or to communicate your actions-results about them, please contact CENFACS

 

 

 

Main Developments

 

Autumn Programme with XI Projects to Build Back Better (Build Back Better Projects)

 

Please find below the projects making CENFACS’ Autumn 2020 of Building Back Better.

11 PROJECTS TO BUILD BACK BETTER: 11 WAYS OF HELPING TO REDUCE AND END POVERTY THIS AUTUMN 2020

 

September 

~ Build Back Better Flora and Fauna projects (including the Big Beasts sub-advocacy) will continue our advocacy work on the protection of plants and animals while implementing new ways of working with local people and organisations in Africa to build back better flora and fauna at the time of the coronavirus pandemic (advocacy)

~ A la Une (Autumn Leaves of Action for the Upkeep of the Nature in Existence) will include our sub-advocacy work on nature, which is Sustainable Trajectories for the Nature.  This year, A la Une project will focus on the Restoration of Ecological Infrastructures in Africa.(Campaign)

~ Autumn Help to Build Back Better (Resource): a new and enhanced support to the CENFACS Community returning from the lockdown and long Summer break 2020.  The resource will contain new information, tips and hints to help the community meet their changing needs due to the coronavirus pandemic.

 

October

~ Autumn Appeal to Support projects (Humanitarian appeal): a renewed engagement with supporters via an appeal to deal with the persisting side effects of the coronavirus on poor people in Africa.

~ Making Memorable Difference (History project): History of African Sculpture and Representation of Historical African Figures of the Pre-independence Era (Period before the 1960s)

~ Poverty Reduction Goals Project: Goal No. 2  – Reduction of Consumption Poverty which is one of the seven goals making CENFACS’ 2020 Development Agenda and Poverty Reduction Programme (Campaign) 

 

November 

~ Health Economics for the Poor: an innovative step forward and initiative that was set up as a result of our Summer 2020 Festival and response to the coronavirus pandemic.  The initiative will help to improve the cost-effectiveness of healthcare provision to the poor in terms of positive health outcomes (Sanitation poverty-relieving project)

~ Women & Children FIRST Development Day (Thoughts): a Talks Day about Child Care and Engendered Effects of the Coronavirus Pandemic in terms of coping and survival strategies against it.

~ Essentia Project: – A sustainable development and poverty-relieving initiative that uses the tenets and attributes of the essential economy in order to help people and communities in need to escape from poverty and hardships while connecting them to essential activities and motivating them to use non-polluting solutions to resolve their long standing problems of poverty and hardships (Essential economic project)

 

November/December 

~ Projects of Advocates against Sanitary Poverty and Unsustainable Ecology – A project of reduction of sanitation poverty and adverse effects on the structure and function of the nature, particularly but not exclusively in the mining sector in Africa (Environmental health project)

~ Covid-19 Campaign – Phase 3: The Campaign of Resilience against the Coronavirus Pandemic by CENFACS is now in in Phase of Rehabilitation Strategies and will continue over this Autumn since Covid-19 has not shown any sign of disappearance. (Health enhancing campaign)

 

Note: Although the above is scheduled for Autumn 2020, we may slightly alter our initial plan and or introduce occasional initiatives to cope with the reality of the unpredictability and complexity of development situations (e.g. coronavirus uncertainty, economic exit of the UK from the EU’s single market, humanitarian and emergency situations), in which case we shall let you know as early as we can.

 

 

 

Getting the Most of your Involvement with CENFACS into Poverty Alleviation Work from Autumn 2020 and Beyond

 

~ Where to start: Sign up!

√ Register with us and or update us with your contact details

√ Respond to our communications and communicate with us when occasion arises

 

~ Stay in touch with our…

√ Newsletter, and other paper and free-paper communication materials

√ Regular updated and upgraded resources and supporting information

 

~ Involving us in raising awareness of the poverty relief issue

√ Advertise with us for helpful good causes

√ Pass our relief messages on to interested third parties 

 

~ Share your transformative experience

√ Tell us what you think and or your development story

√ Help us improve with your voices, comments, reports and feedbacks

 

~ Boost your support

√ Support us according to your means and limits as every support counts

√ Add value to your support, if you can, by improving your support to us to support you and or others

 

~ Get noticed to go further with your involvement

√ Register and keep up to date with information about your event, project, activity and so on

√ Join up our network of poverty relief and development work

 

~ Stay ahead of the game with us

√ Communicate with us before hands and when the needs arise

√ Often read our news alerts, tweets and switch to our new developments 

 

~ Deliver on your promises 

√ If you promise to do something for or with CENFACS and others, please do it

√ If you can’t do it, please let us know.  Don’t just stay silent!      

                           

~ Make our communications with you to be a two-way process and multi-channel approach

√ Talk to CENFACS and CENFACS will talk to you as well and vice versa

√ Help us improve the flow of information on poverty relief and development using a variety of channels and platforms 

 

~ Be contactable and present via

√ E-mail, (tele or mobile) phones, physical address and social media platforms

√ Word-of-mouth recommendations, outreach and other means of contact (like video calls)

 

~ Get the word out on your communication channels

√ Spread the word about CENFACS’ work on your social media links

√ Promote CENFACS’ work in what and where you think we can fit in

 

~ Keep your involvement with CENFACS digital and on papers

√ Up-to-date information on to your mobile by our free text alerts and messages

√ Check CENFACS’ website and make enquiries online 24 hours 7 days a week

 

~ Act upon information received from us

√ Don’t just read or hear them and do nothing about them.  Please react and be vocal!

√ If they are irrelevant to you, please pass them onto an interested and committed party

 

~ Continue the legacy of CENFACS’ work

√ It is now 18 years and two months that CENFACS has been working on poverty relief and sustainable development since it was registered in 2002.  You can continue this legacy with us.

√ You can be the face of CENFACS to those looking for a lifeline of support from us.

The above ways of getting involved in CENFACS’ work may not be exhaustive.  Should you have any other way, please let us know.

To get involved with CENFACS into poverty reduction work, just let us know.

 

(2) United Nations General Assembly, 2016: Report of the Open-Ended Intergovernmental Expert 2Working Group on Indicators and Terminology Relating to Disaster Risk Reduction. Seventy-First Session, Item 19(c). A/71/644.

 

Help CENFACS keep the Poverty Relief work going in 2020.

We do our work on a very small budget and on a voluntary basis.  Making a donation will show us you value our work and support CENFACS’ work, which is currently offered as a free service. 

One could consider a recurring donation to CENFACS in the future.

Donate to support CENFACS!

 

FOR ONLY £1, YOU CAN SUPPORT CENFACS AND CENFACS’ PROJECTS, JUST GO TO http://cenfacs.org.uk/supporting-us/

Thank you for visiting CENFACS website and reading this post.

Thank you as well to those who made or make comments about our weekly posts.

We look forward to receiving your regular visits and continuing support throughout 2020 and beyond.

With many thanks.

 

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Back-to-school Poverty

Welcome to CENFACS’ Online Diary!

09 September 2020

 

Post No. 160

 

 

The Week’s Contents

 

• Back-to-school Poverty

• Back-to-the Upkeep of the Nature with the Theme of “Blue Spaces”

• Coming in Autumn 2020: The 69th Issue of FACS Newsletter, to be entitled as The Post-coronavirus Poverty Relief Restructuring

 

… and much more!

 

 

 

Key Messages

 

• Back-to-school Poverty

 

The 160th post of our blog page goes further in discussing the back-to-school poverty as the first key message and main development.  This key message and main development deals with back-to-school challenge, poverty issue, support that CENFACS can provide during the back-to-school period, expenses budget and the particularity of this year’s back-to-school; back-to-school which is happening in the middle of the battle against the coronavirus pandemic.

Back-to-school poverty is what we are trying to help reduce or eradicate within our back-to-relief programme this Autumn 2020.  We are discussing it while carrying on back-to-relief programme and services. 

Back-to-school is a challenging time for many families and parents especially for those on low income brackets or just poor.  It is even extremely difficult for many of them as we are in an exceptional time of the coronavirus pandemic which has added more pain to these families and parents.  This pain is whether we talk about project beneficiaries here in the UK or in Africa.

For more on back-to-school poverty, please read under the Main Development section of this post.

 

 

• Back-to-the Upkeep of the Nature with the Theme of “Blue Spaces”

 

Our protection work on Oceans, which we conducted last September 2019, is continuing this year with the theme ofBlue Spaces”.  The protection of Oceans was an environmental case.  This year, the theme of “Blue Spaces” goes beyond environmental protection as the emphasis is put on the blue development and poverty relief. 

Indeed, we are trying to look at the extent to which the “Blue Spaces” together with the blue economy are helping people in Africa and elsewhere to alleviate or escape from poverty.   This is what one can call “blue poverty relief“.

We are as well revisiting the sustainable development goals by re-exploring the role and place that the “Blue Spaces” are playing in capacitating poor people’s sustainable development.  This is what one can term as “blue sustainable development“.

To materialise what we have just said, we have planned three key notes which deal with the environmental health, poverty-relieving and developmental aspects of our work on the “Blue Spaces”.  These notes are as follows:

(1) The coronavirus-induced Impacts on the “Blue Spaces

(2) The contribution of the “Blue Spaces” to poverty reduction

(3) The place of the “Blue Spaces” in sustainable development in Africa

 

Let’s summarise the first notes of our September 2020 work on waters; notes which started from 07 September 2020.

 

• • Week beginning 07/09/2020: The Coronavirus-induced Impacts on theBlue Spaces

 

As mentioned in our communication of last week, we are dealing with theBlue Spaces(that is visible surface waters like rivers, ponds, lakes, canals, fountains, etc.).  These first notes of theBlue Spaces” theme are on the indirect impacts of the coronavirus pandemic on the different types of “Blue spaces”.   

In these notes of our water theme, we are trying to look at how the crippling effects of the coronavirus pandemic could have reached some of the “Blue Spaces”.  We are in particular gathering information and discussing through data based evidence how new products to protect humans against the coronavirus and the methods used to produce them are impacting the environmental health of waters and of humans and other living beings (plants and animals).

For example, we are searching if products such as disposal face coverings, personal protection equipment, gloves, cleaning products and so on are not ending in the “Blue Spaces” as waste disposal.  If they are ending in waters, there is a need to step up an awareness and educational campaign to stop the pollution of waters and air with the coronavirus protection products after their use.

The above is a summary of our first notes for the “Blue Spaces” campaign.  To enquire about this campaign and to add your input to it, just contact CENFACS.

 

 

 

• Coming in Autumn 2020: The 69th Issue of FACS Newsletter

 

The Autumn Issue for our bilingual newsletter FACS will be entitled as follows:

The Post-coronavirus Poverty Relief Restructuring

The following is an abstract about this Issue and the kinds of contents that will make it. 

 

• • Abstract for the 69th Issue of FACS

 

One of the lessons to learn from the coronavirus pandemic is that the business of poverty reduction will not be the same as it was in the pre-coronavirus period.  There will be a need to restructure the way in which poverty relief work is conducted. 

This restructuring is also an economic one.  The classification of economic activities between essential and non-essential, between healthy and unhealthy many need to be pursued so that one can exactly determine what economic activities are useful and helpful in reducing poverty and hardships, perhaps in ending them in Africa and elsewhere. 

Likewise, within the charity and voluntary sector there could be a need to remap activities and make them fit into the post-coronavirus emerging poverty relief and development landscapes.  The constituent organisations of this sector can reorganise their poverty reduction work in order to improve the poverty reduction outcomes.  This restructuring is not only economic one in terms of cutting costs, efficiency and generating more income; but it is mostly about delivering poverty-relief lasting value for the service provided so that one can see the end of poverty.

Our Africa-based Sister Organisations cannot be exempted from the restructuring storm.  Each organisation may need to reappraise and restructure its activities and operations in the light of the realities of the post-coronavirus development world.  This is not simply about labelling services or activities Covid-19 proof or secure.  Poverty Reduction Restructuring is more than that.  Then, what is it?

Poverty Relief Restructuring is deep like economic restructuring.  It is a total rethinking and rethought of our philosophy on the way we approach poverty issues.  Since the world is experiencing a global health crisis, Poverty Relief Restructuring is about integrating sanitation and health at the heart of the process of relieving poverty in both a specific and wider contexts.  Re-contextualise and re-conceptualise poverty reduction in this way will help to deliver service value for an end to sanitation poverty and poverty in general. 

The Post-coronavirus Poverty Relief Restructuring is about the kinds of changes that can be made to the constituent parts of the poverty relief architecture so that it reflects and provides the results that those in most need want.

The Post-coronavirus Poverty Relief Restructuring is a journey towards finding new ideas, practices and ways of relieving poverty in the newly reshaped development landscape while trying to rework some of the pre-coronavirus development paradigms of poverty reduction so that one can make them relevant to the post-Covid-19 world. 

The Post-coronavirus Poverty Relief Restructuring is also a move together with our local people and beneficiaries in finding better approaches to pull out poverty and hardships those who are still lagging behind in the cohort.  The Post-coronavirus Poverty Relief Restructuring is a theoretical shift from a conventional economic model to a coronavirus-free economic base or a pro-poor based economic model.        

The Post-coronavirus Poverty Relief Restructuring is more than just a tactical issue or make up.  It is about strategically rethinking on how to build and develop lasting poverty relief systems while taking into account the coronavirus pandemic and other threats or dimensions (like the climate change).   

The above gives a bit some flavour or idea about the next issue of FACS, the 69th Issue of FACS Newsletter. 

For any enquiries and or queries about this Issue, please do not hesitate to contact CENFACS.

 

 

 

Extra Messages

 

• 2020 September Advice service continues…

 

as planned for both UK and Africa projects.  We have provided below basic activities making the contents of advice services.  While this Advice-giving support is running, we are collecting and discussing Summer 2020 Reports or Tales as well.

The following are the areas covered by CENFACS‘ September 2020 Advice-giving Activities. 

 

• • Areas of Advice for Individuals we cover

 

We can provide advisory support on a wide range of issues which includes:

post-regional economic integration and economic transition skills, financial literacy and information, consumption and buying information, conversion of technical skills, domestic violence, HIV/AIDS awareness, education and training, educational development of children, cultural barriers, knowledge and respect of the British rule of law, opportunities for enterprises and credit access, social integration and behaviour, self-help development projects, coronavirus-induced poverty and hardships etc. 

 

• • Areas of Advice for Organisations we cover 

 

We can provide advisory support on the following areas:

project planning and development, investment in capacity building and development, resource mobilisation for African Sister Organisations for the Post-REI (Regional Economic Integration) and post-coronavirus times, sources of international fundraising, climate finance and digital finance, online fundraising strategies, etc.

You can request advice online by just filling an advice form at www.cenfacs.org.uk/services-activities and by posting it to CENFACS and CENFACS will get back to you.

 

  

• Virtual Open Day and Hours (VODHs): How They Work

 

Our Virtual Open Day, which is every Fridays of September 2020, is held from 10 am to 2 pm.

You can access VOHs by contacting CENFACS.

You do not need to register with us.

Every Fridays, you can either email or phone or even text between 10 am and 2 pm.

 

 

  

• Summer 2020 Reporting in Your Own Words and Numbers

 

Last week, we started to unlock or unpack our Summer holiday data and to prepare to tell our Summer holiday stories.  This week, we are going further in putting into practice our unlocked or unpacked data in support of Summer experiences or stories. 

From this week until Saturday the 19th of September 2020, we are simply asking those who can to share with us and others their Summer experiences; experiences about what they did during the Summer break and think that it is useful for sharing. 

The 2020 Summer Experiences Reporting activity is a further experience of reporting, sharing, learning and development opportunity for those who have not yet informed us about the outcomes of projects; projects pending for reporting, personal experiences to be shared, lessons to learn and development trends to spot.

 

• • Sharing Development Experiences, Stories, Tales and Reports about Summer 2020

 

As we are nearly reaching the end of Summer 2020, we would like our users and supporters as well as those who sympathise with CENFACS’ cause to share with us and others their experiences, stories and reports about the following:

√ Run, Play and Vote projects (Triple Value Initiatives): You can feedback the outcomes or Action-Results of your RunPlay and Vote projects.

√ Volunteering and Creation Stories: You can also share your volunteering stories with us and others if you did volunteer during the Summer break. 

√ Summer programmes: Healthiness and Appeal projects: You may prefer to report on your use of Healthiness projects and your response to our Humanitarian Relief Appeal projects.

√ August 2020 Trending Activities: You can as well report on your experience of following the direction of poverty reduction through socials and virtual worlds.

√ Other Experiences and Stories Reporting: You can feedback on any moving experience or transformative story you have had during Summer 2020.

√ “Mission” Activities: As we are in CENFACS’ “Mission” Year, we would be more than happier to hear any stories related to this year’s dedication.

You can report your experience via e-mail, over phone and through social media networks or channels of communication (e.g Twitter).  

Thank you for supporting us with your Summer 2020 experience, story and report In Your Own Words and Numbers.

 

 

 

Main Development

 

Back-to-school poverty

 

Our discussion revolves around the following matters: back-to-school challenge, poverty, back-to-school disrupted by the coronavirus and back-to-school budget and support.

 

• • Back-to-school time as a challenging period for a basic human right and a deserving cause

 

For some, back-to-school is a normal time to prepare and do normal purchase whether is for school uniforms or books or even any other school items.  However, for those who are struggling to make ends meet, back-to-school time could be a very challenging moment as they may not always have enough financial resources or support to cope with the requirements of the start of the new school year.  Yet, education is a basic human right and a deserving need for children and the all society. 

This year’s back-to-school is even more challenging as the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent lockdowns have disrupted the normal preparation of back-to-school.  This disruption starts since the lockdown began, from the purchasing of what pupils and students need to the format or formula of the school start.

 

• • Back-to-school disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent lockdowns

 

This year’s back-to-school is special as the crippling effects of the coronavirus and lockdowns continue to disrupt the entire organisation of the back-to-school for this September school entry 2020/2021.   

The coronavirus pandemic has completely changed the way in which back-to-school has to be approached in many aspects by including enhanced health and safety measures such as social distancing rules, disinfection of educational materials and establishment, daily number of people allowed by square meter in any educational infrastructures, etc.

The coronavirus pandemic has introduced new items while increasing the level of spending for other existing items in the back-to-school budget.  It has brought new social rules such as the wearing of face coverings and the regular use of sanitising products.  This can only affect the togetherness and school community life. 

The coronavirus pandemic has changed the patterns and habits of working life and socialisation while introducing or reinforcing the virtual and online dimensions in the back-to-school preparation and delivery. 

Briefly, due to the coronavirus pandemic the all health and safety policies and practices have to be redesigned and tested against the pandemic.  While this has been done, some of those parents and families who do not have enough for their children can find themselves in a back-to-school poverty with them.  They could be in the back-to-school poverty while still struggling against sanitation poverty caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

 

• • Back-to-school poverty

 

Back-to-school poverty is the inability to afford the educational requirements of the start of the new school year.  It is the inability for parents and carers to meet the basic life-sustaining needs of education for their children in terms of purchasing school items (such as uniforms, clothes, books, electronics, etc.). 

This incapacity can include other expenses that compete against or with educational materials; expenses that are school fees, living expenses to start a new school year, transport cost to travel to schools, food, a place to study at home, family relocation, etc.

Besides these universal costs, there are new costs due to the coronavirus.  They can include the following: buying soaps and often wash children’s clothes to disinfect them from the traces of the coronavirus, preparing special lunchboxes with items to disinfect hands and tools before eating, providing to each child personal school utensils to avoid any exchange with other school mates, etc. 

Families and parents living in poverty or on a tight family budget may not be able to afford these additional expenses budget.  They are forced to currently deal with two types poverty: back-to-school poverty and sanitation poverty.  The first type of poverty is related to the start of the new school year whereas the second is caused by the pressure from the coronavirus pandemic.  There could be support for some of the vital educational and sanitation needs to be met; just as there is no support for others.

 

• • Back-to-school support at CENFACS

 

Any type of poverty needs response.  As far as CENFACS is concerned, we can support those falling into back-to-school poverty trap by providing advice through our advisory package under the back-to-relief programme.  This package includes activities such as advice, advocacy, information, guidance, signposting, etc. 

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, we have enhanced health and safety aspects in this programme.  We are also providing support related to the adverse effects of the coronavirus pandemic and lockdown on those who are looking for this type of support.  Although our support to fight both back-to-school poverty and sanitation poverty is small and limited, it can nevertheless help beneficiaries to get something and keep moving towards of a BIG relief.

Since the battle against the coronavirus pandemic is not yet over, there are limitations on the ways our support can be accessed.  It can be accessed as follows:

√ Only virtually on a no face-to-face physical basis, but on a one-to-one basis or as a group

√ Over phone

√ Via e-mail

√ and by filing the comment box on our website saying the type of support you need

 

Where beneficiaries have access to video technology, we can arrange a meeting via a video scream. 

Where a physical meeting with beneficiaries is unavoidable, extra precautionary health and safety measures will be taken before the advice can happen.

To seek advice or support regarding your back-to-school poverty or hardships, please contact CENFACS.

 

• • Back-to-school Special Budget

 

The 2020/2021 Back-to-school Special Budget is a special one for many parents and families as they have to cost and integrate the aforementioned aspects of protection related to the coronavirus pandemic into the educational budget of their children. 

Although young children may not be wearing face masks, there are still some levels of investment that parents and families may have to do to keep the education of their children to an internationally agreed standard.  They may have to proceed with the following initiatives:

√ Invest in distance learning technologies (such as tablets, laptops, mobile phones, etc.)

√ Improve their access to internet and broadband supplies

√ Reorganise space at home to create an office-like desk environment for e-learning and video calling for the educational purpose of their children

All this type of investment will create additional costs in the back-to-school plans, although some of these will not be at the start of the school.    

For poor families and parents, it is even more difficult for them to keep the educational level of their children to a good standard unless they get financial support to their back-to-school budget. 

For those parents and families who are struggling to write their back-to-school budget, we can help them to do that.  We can as well advise on some of the aspects related to the back-to-school budget preparation.  Furthermore, we can lead them to specific advice services related to back-to-school matters.

To seek advice or support regarding your back-to-school budget, please contact CENFACS.

 

Help CENFACS keep the Poverty Relief work going in 2020.

We do our work on a very small budget and on a voluntary basis.  Making a donation will show us you value our work and support CENFACS’ work, which is currently offered as a free service. 

One could consider a recurring donation to CENFACS in the future.

Donate to support CENFACS!

 

FOR ONLY £1, YOU CAN SUPPORT CENFACS AND CENFACS’ PROJECTS, JUST GO TO http://cenfacs.org.uk/supporting-us/

Thank you for visiting CENFACS website and reading this post.

Thank you as well to those who made or make comments about our weekly posts.

We look forward to receiving your regular visits and continuing support throughout 2020 and beyond.

With many thanks.

  

Leave a comment

Back-to-relief Programme 2020

Welcome to CENFACS’ Online Diary!

02 September 2020

 

Post No. 159

 

 

Welcome Message

 

Before starting the contents of the blog and post of this first week of September 2020, we would like to welcome all those who are returning this month. 

We are welcoming the following:

All those who are returning from the coronavirus lockdown

Our users, supporters and other stakeholders who came back from Summer break and holiday 

Those who are or have been working during the Summer time 

Those who lost touch with us for various reasons and would like to come back again.  

This welcoming message applies to both our UK and Africa Development programmes. 

Welcome back to all of you and healthy return! 

 

 

 

 

The Week’s Contents

  

• Back-to-relief Programme: Programme for Pre-autumn Season 2020

• Unlock your Summer Holiday Data and Tell your Story

• September: Advice-giving Month

 

… and much more!

 

 

 

Key Messages

 

The key message from our weekly communication and menu, which is often made of three courses, is as follows.

 

• Back-to-relief Programme: Programme for Pre-autumn Season 2020

  

Back-to-relief Programme is a set of related activities and services with an aim of reducing poverty amongst multi-dimensionally poor children, young and families (MDPCYPFs) by working with them to meet their needs after a long summer break and Covid-19 lockdown so that they can start September without or with less hardship.   

The programme is made of a number of supportive elements such as capacity and skills development, advice, advocacy, translation, information, guidance, support to child educational needs in Africa, signposting etc.  The programme is generally run around September and can be extended to October depending on the needs in the community.

This year’s programme is a bit special since there has been the coronavirus pandemic which led to lockdowns.  Many of our project and programme beneficiaries have experienced many months of economic inactivity since the coronavirus pandemic and lockdown began.  Now that some of them are returning or resuming their outdoor activities, they may need some advice to adjust their lives with the new normal imposed by the coronavirus and subsequent lockdown.

The Back-to-relief 2020 programme has been designed to include the need of these returnees from the lockdown.  It is also conceptualised to anticipate any changes of situation due to any potential spikes of Covid-19 and lockdown resumption as the battle against the coronavirus has not been yet won. 

For more on CENFACSBack-to-relief Programme, please read the details under Main Development section of this post.

 

 

 

• Unlock your Summer Holiday Data and Tell your Story

 

Throughout our July and August 2020 communications, we have been asking everybody to store and keep their Summer data so that when we all return we can report back or share parts of our Summer experiences that are shareable.

Now some of you are back, we can try to feedback our poverty-relieving and development experiences of using Healthiness projects and of the gradual reopening of the economy as well as of the coronavirus restrictions and rules over the Summer period.

One can also feedback of any creations made, of any interaction in the virtual worlds, of any community experiences and any volunteering stories, if they volunteered, over the last two months.  One can report back a personal Summer experience as well. 

For those who managed to store their Summer data and who would like to share their experiences, this is the time to start unlocking your Summer data and preparing to tell your Summer story.

Sharing your experiences with us in this way helps to keep the CENFACS Community active, engaged and together.  It also contributes in carrying out prescriptive analytics that enables to use smart data discovery capabilities to predict market developments and trends to help relieve or possibly end poverty and hardships within our community and beyond. 

Please share your poverty-relieving and development experiences and contents with us; parts of your experiences and contents that you think are shareable.

Should anyone have any concern about data protection issues regarding the sharing of their information, please let CENFACS know.  We will be able to assist.

 

 

 

 

• September: Advice-giving Month

 

We run Advice service as part of our activities throughout the year.  However, Advice is CENFACS’ main theme in September.  Because that, it is more pronounced in September compared to other months of the year.  In other words, we invest more resources in advice in September than at any other times of the year.

We provide advice to both individuals and organisations as mentioned above.  Advice can be given in the context of Back-to-Relief Programme and outside this context.  When Advice is given in the context of Back-to-Relief Programme, it becomes constituent part of this programme like other elements making this programme.

Under the Main Development section of this post, there is much more information about this year’s advisory support.

 

 

 

Extra Messages

  

• The African Sahel and Lake Chad Basin Appeal against Extreme Poverty

 

After reviewing the situation in the African Sahel and Lake Chad Basin as well as the previous appeals launched for them, it has been noticed that very little has been done on the grounds to deal with the following:

to reduce extreme poverty and internal displacement

to improve poor people’s security and resilience

to stop the life-threatening and destroying impacts of the climate change in these two areas. 

As a result, we are re-appealing for peace, security and extreme poverty alleviation in these two areas of Africa. 

To support or enquire about this re-appeal, please contact CENFACS.   

Likewise, our Summer 2020 Humanitarian Relief Appeal projects are still running and will end this September.   

To donate or support otherwise, please go to:   http://cenfacs.org.uk/supporting-us/

 

   

 

• Back-to-relief Activities in a September of Covid-19 Compliance

 

Our call for Covid-19 Compliance continues this September.   Many people would have wished the fight against the coronavirus pandemic to finish by now; unfortunately the coronavirus pandemic is still around with its side effects and threats.

Because of that, we have made efforts in the design of these Back-to-relief Activities to test the Covid-19 impact on them and to make them Covid-19 secure.  In other words, we have included the recommended measures of health and safety against the coronavirus in these activities.  In practical terms, social distancing rules, the use of sanitising and disinfection products as well as personal protective equipment will be fully compliant during the running of these activities.

For further discussions on Back-to-relief activities in a September of Covid-19 Compliance, please contact CENFACS.

 

 

 

• Covid-19 Campaign Update

 

The Campaign for Resilience against Covid-19 (or the Covid-19 Campaign) is now between its phases 2 and 3. 

Phase 2 has been about Impact Monitoring and Evaluation of Covid-19 on our system of poverty reduction.  It seeks to answer a specific cause-and-effect question about changes directly attributable to Covid-19.  In this phase 2, we have been looking at the causality and attribution approach regarding the overall impact of Covid-19 on CENFACS’ work and system of poverty reduction. 

Phase 3 is the Post-Covid-19 Rehabilitation Strategies, which are processes of planning and conducting restoration in order to bring back our programmes, projects, activities, services and products to their original or normal condition.  It is a restoration or build-back campaign.  

We understand that economies cannot be shut down for ever.  Because the economy keeps reopening, we too are gradually moving to the Phase 3 of our Covid-19 Campaign, which is of Post-Covid-19 Rehabilitation Strategies

By speaking about Post-Covi-19 Rehabilitation Strategies, we do not mean that the coronavirus pandemic is over.  We just mean that in our mind set Covid-19 is a reality but not a fiction.  We have to understand it and live in the Covid-19 environment until a medicine and vaccine are found against it. 

So, the idea of the existence of Covid-19 has been already passed in our mind set.  What we need to do is to develop strategies to restore our work while taking into account the new coronavirus-led environment or reality.  In this respect, we are trying to Build Back Better our lives through a Build-Back-Better Campaign.

Some of you may have noticed that in our Covid-19 Campaign, there are two strands of thought. There are initiatives that we took that are related to our work in the UK.  There is a set of campaigning initiatives that have been linked to our work in Africa.

Regarding the Covid-19 Campaign in relation to our work on Africa, the Covid-19 extra message of this week is that we are continuing following the development of the epidemiological curves of the coronavirus pandemic in Africa where cases keep on increasing.  This increasing trend of the “epi-cruves” can only mean to us to keep up shadowing them (“epi-curves”) while motivating our Africa-based partners to carry on in rebuilding health systems to keep tight control on the Covid-19.  We continue to monitor the development of the “epi-curves” in Africa and respond with our shadowing model accordingly.        

To support and or to enquire about the Covid-19 Campaign update, please contact CENFACS.

 

 

 

 

Main Development

 

Back-to-relief Programme: Programme for Pre-autumn Season 2020

 

• • Back-to-relief Projects 

 

As previously mentioned, most of our projects and programmes are organised to take into account the lives and needs of our beneficiaries; supporters as well.  Some of them will be back this week after the coronavirus disruption.  They are back for the New Academic Year and New Relief, year for which we have prepared projects and programmes to meet their existing, challenging, changing and coronavirus-emerging needs – the back-to-relief projects and programmes in a September of Covid-19 Compliance.

Amongst the back-to-relief projects and programmes, there are these two ones:  Virtual Open Days and Support to Children 

 

=> Virtual Open Days under Back-to-Relief Programme

 

Due to the health-threatening impacts and other crippling effects of the coronavirus pandemic, many of our services are virtually and online run.  Besides that it is not always easy for people, especially those who have some physical handicaps and parents with small kids, to physically move and meet service providers if this service provision cannot come to them even if the need is pressing. 

This is why we are organising these virtual days to enable those in need to virtually access services despite the coronavirus disruption and any physical inconvenience they may have.

Virtual Open Days are a back-to-relief initiative organised by CENFACS during this September 2020 to enable people in need to access our advice service and other similar services in order to reduce or end poverty linked to their situations or conditions of life.

For more on CENFACS’ Virtual Open Days and how they work, contact us.

 

=> Support for Children of Conflict- and Climate Change-affected Areas in Africa in this September

 

Another back-to-relief initiative for this September 2020 is Support for the Children of Conflict- and Climate Change-affected Areas of Africa in this September and beyond.  This initiative relates to the humanitarian appeals we launched this year (such as the 3-Frontier Area, the Democratic Republic of Congo, the African Sahel and Burkina Faso).  All these appeals were launched under the Light projects.   

The appeals were related to countries with displaced persons and victims of conflict (e.g. Burkina Faso); undergoing peace and institutional rebuilding work (e.g. DRC); children victims of conflict (e.g. the 3-Frontier Area); under armed attacks (e.g. African Sahel).

While one can still ask the progress made to save and rebuild lives in these stricken countries and areas, one can also question about the support that the children of the affected areas within these countries are receiving and/or received, especially at this difficult time of the coronavirus pandemic. 

This questioning is relevant as we are in September when a new school or academic year starts in many parts of the world.  This questioning is even founded at this time where educational systems in many countries have been affected by the adverse impacts of the coronavirus and subsequent lockdowns.  This negative effect is even greater for children from poor places in developing countries (like of Africa) where educational opportunities have been denied to many of them regardless of the coronavirus situation. 

So, during this September we will be working on this back-to-relief initiative to explore ways of keeping education alive for these unfortunate children living in those stricken areas or places.

For further details about this initiative, contact CENFACS.  

 

• • Back to the Upkeep of the Nature this September 2020

 

September is also the month we resume our advocacy work on the upkeep of the nature.  Normally, this advocacy starts from the protection and care of animals in Africa from illegal killings, extinction and poaching.  In the last week of September 2020, we shall focus on saving endangered animal species through our “Big Beasts” advocacy, which has already kicked off.

In September 2019, we worked on the Protection of the Oceans (particularly the waters surrounding Africa and the rivers and lakes in Africa) as well.  This September, we would like to carry on with the advocacy on waters through the theme of “Blue Spaces”.  We shall have a 3-week water protection work on “Blue Spaces” starting from the 7th of September 2020.  To conclude the month, we will have some e-discussions on circular economy.

Briefly, Back to the Upkeep of the Nature this September 2020 will include the “Big Beasts” advocacy, the Protection of the “Blue Spaces” and an e-discussion on circular economy.

 

• • Back to Advisory Support this September 2020

 

As above mentioned, Advice is CENFACS’ main theme for September.  We provide advice to both individuals and organisations.

 

=> Advice service for Individuals

 

Some of you are aware that most of CENFACS services in the UK are designed to support multi-dimensionally poor children, young people and families (CYPFs).  After the long summer break and the Covid-19 lockdown, many of them will come back to start their life again.  From September onward, they will go back to school for CYPs and to work and training for parents and guardians. 

They may need support to restart or look for occupational opportunity or even just resume their routine activity in September.  Their needs could include the following:

√ Finding a new school or a nursery for children

√ Registration to health services

√ Finding accommodation or relocating

√ Accessing training opportunity or employment for those who lost their job due to the Covid-19

√ Looking for a new occupation to deal with the economic effects of the coronavirus and lockdown

√ Finding help to adjust their life after the lockdown

√ Looking for direction in a gradually reopened economy

Etc.

We can provide advisory support to them. Where our capacity is limited, we can refer and/or signpost them to relevant specialist services and organisations to help them meet their needs.

We do it under CENFACS’ Capacity Advice service which was established since 2003 (through CENFACS’ Capacity Advice and Development project for Croydon’s African and Minority Ethnic People) to help individuals gain various types of help.

  

The types of help we provide include: 

√ Translation (English to French and vice versa)

√ Interpreting

√ General advice

√ Guidance

√ Signposting

√ Referral

√ Advocacy

Etc. 

As we are in a digital era, we adapted the provision of this help while still retaining its essence. 

In the last months, we have even gone far with our Advice service as we were trying to deal with the coronavirus pandemic effect.  We have included the coronavirus restrictions and rules into our Advice service. 

You can contact CENFACS for the range of issues included in this service and to find out if your problem can be dealt with.

 

=> Advice service for Organisations 

 

The same advice service applies to overseas and Africa-based Sister Organisations. 

Under our international advice service, we can advise them on the following matters:

√ Capacity building and development

√ Project planning and development

√ Fundraising and grant-seeking leads

√ Income generation and streams

√ Sustainable development

√ Monitoring and evaluation  

 

Since we have set up a CENFACS Analytics Dashboard, it is even better to deal with problems.

Again, where our capacity to advise is limited, we can refer and or signpost them to relevant international services and organisations. This advisory support for Africa-based Sister Organisations is throughout the year and constituent part of our work with them.  However, they can take advantage of our advice-giving month to seek further advice on any of the above matters.

To access advice services, contact CENFACS.  To register for or enquire about advice services, go to www.cenfacs.org.uk/services-activities.

 

Help CENFACS keep the Poverty Relief work going in 2020.

We do our work on a very small budget and on a voluntary basis.  Making a donation will show us you value our work and support CENFACS’ work, which is currently offered as a free service. 

One could consider a recurring donation to CENFACS in the future.

Donate to support CENFACS!

 

FOR ONLY £1, YOU CAN SUPPORT CENFACS AND CENFACS’ PROJECTS, JUST GO TO http://cenfacs.org.uk/supporting-us/

Thank you for visiting CENFACS website and reading this post.

Thank you as well to those who made or make comments about our weekly posts.

We look forward to receiving your regular visits and continuing support throughout 2020 and beyond.

With many thanks.

 

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CENFACS Annual Review 2019/2020

Welcome to CENFACS’ Online Diary!

26 August 2020

 

Post No. 158

 

 

The Week’s Contentes

 

• CENFACS Annual Review 2019/2020

• Trending in Poverty Reduction in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance – In Focus from Week Beginning 24/08/2020: Social Virtual Worlds as Means to Online Interaction to Reduce Reduction

• All-in-one Impact Feedback: Report on Reports

…. and much more!

 

 

 

 

Key Messages

 

• CENFACS Annual Review 2019/2020

 

CENFACS Annual Review 2019/2020 is a snapshot of what we did between 1 July 2019 and 30 June 2020.  As it is stated, it is neither a statutory annual report nor an annual return.

It is a summary of the year 2019/2020 in the life of CENFACS that reports back to our supporters, users and other stakeholders the impact we have made; impact through stories, quantitative and qualitative data. 

It highlights accomplishments made and recollects milestones for the above stated year.

It is as well a performance review and annual review story of our finances.

For more on this review, please read under the Main Development section of this post.

 

 

 

• Trending in Poverty Reduction in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance – In Focus from Week Beginning 24/08/2020: Social Virtual Worlds as Means to Online Interaction to Reduce Reduction

 

The last episode in our trending series in poverty reduction in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance is about the impacts that Social Virtual Worlds can make on poverty reduction.  This week, we are following the social virtual world trends in their capacity of reducing poverty for those who are interacting in a virtual world environment.

Although the objective of virtual world is interaction in the world, it is still possible to check if poor gamers can use the opportunity of being in the virtual world to reduce poverty.  For example, one can try to check if poor gamers who are playing those massively multiplier online games (such as Fortnite, League of Legends, Pokémon, etc.) are finding any windows of opportunity to reduce poverty through those games. 

Before, going any further, let us say a few works about virtual worlds.

 

=> What is virtual world?

 

There are many online and print definitions of virtual worlds.  To make things easy we have selected the following online definition of virtual world which is this:

A virtual world is a computer-simulated representation of a world with specific spatial and physical characteristics, and users of virtual worlds interact with each other via representations of themselves called “avatars.”…

The objective of virtual worlds is to continue participating in the world, interact with other users, and gaining more status or experience within the virtual world’. (1)

Although this definition is technically restrictive and is telling us that playing in a virtual world is an end itself, we are interested in virtual world that is purpose-built for social or socialisation.  We are interested in social interaction-based virtual worlds through our process of following the direction of poverty reduction.

 

=> Following the direction of poverty reduction via social virtual worlds

 

We are looking at how interaction-based virtual worlds can help to reduce poverty and enhance sustainable development.  In other words, we are trying to find out if playing online video games like World of Warcraft can help their players or gamers to go beyond the interaction in the world by finding windows of relief from poverty and hardships, especially for those gamers of poor background. 

 

=> Poverty-relieving experience via social virtual worlds 

 

Although the objective of a virtual world is interaction in the world, it is possible for people engaged in the MMOGs to do their own assessment to find out whether or not social virtual worlds are helping them to reduce poverty and enhance aspects of sustainable development in their lives. 

The purpose here is that being in a virtual world is primarily for social interaction in the world.  However, if you are poor being in any world whether virtual or non-virtual should be also an opportunity to find ways of escaping from poverty and hardships.  This is regardless of what those who designed their world in which you are they may think of. 

For example, joining a computer-based online community environment is it poverty-relieving in itself?  If not, what can you do to make your journey in the virtual world an experience of relief from poverty and hardships?

The above is our way of following the direction of poverty through social virtual worlds. 

To enquire about this trending activity and /or to follow the direction of poverty with us, just contact CENFACS.

 

(1) https://cs.stanford.edu/people/eroberts/courses/cs181/projects/2007-08/virtual-worlds/history.html

 

 

• All-in-one Impact Feedback: Report on Reports

 

Last month was our Analytics month.  As part of the Analytics month, we asked some of you to report or give some feedback in your words and numbers on the experiences you had about the projects and programmes we delivered in the last financial year. 

We asked for two feedbacks: feedback from individuals as programme and project supporters and users, as well as feedback from organisations (Africa-based Sister Organisations).  Some of you responded and others did not.  We would like to thank those who responded.  

After analysing the information that the respondents provided and looking back what happened in the last financial year, we would like to share with you, through this report, some key information from the preliminary findings about your say and our look at last year’s poverty relief work.

 

Report on feedbacks from Individuals and Organisations

 

=> Aims

 

This report aims at examining and informing what you told us from the feedbacks we asked about the experiences you had with the programmes and projects we selected to monitor, evaluate and review last July.  In particular, it aims …

√ To get the experiences that project supporters and users had with the programmes and projects selected for monitoring, evaluation, review, assurance and analysis

√ To know the views of project supporters, users and other stakeholders on how they perceived and interacted with CENFACS’ products and services

√ To find out where things went well and where they did not

√ To reflect the needs of Africa-based Sister Organisations in future programmes and projects development

√ To improve the way we work with them.

 

=> Findings

 

Our findings from what you said are as follows:

√ To put a time limit on campaigns

√ To make the voices of the users resonate and visible in our advocacy materials and publicity

√ To get more data and further access to data about work in Africa with Africa-based Sister Organisations

√ To narrow the scope of appeals to match CENFACS’ mission, aims and objectives

√ To make the Individual-Capacity-Development-Programme resources reachable and accessible by all users

 

=> Recommendations

 

The report recommends the following:

 

√ To undertake a better advertisement or reach out in the future so that many people can turn out and contribute to children and women projects

√ To communicate the outputs and outcomes of each campaign at their different stages of delivery

√ To insert users’ description (e.g. quotes, comments, etc.) in the published advocacy materials

√ To reduce the gap in data availability and access as far as African projects are concerned

√ To ensure that appeals reflect specific and clearly defined needs of users and beneficiaries with specific aims and objectives to achieve

√ To improve the coverage of Individual-Capacity-Development-Programme resources to reach all the users while explaining all the technical jargons by making them understandable to our diverse audience

The report concludes that every effort will be made within CENFACS so that the wishes of supporters, users and African organisations as expressed in their feedbacks could be translated into tangible action in the future.

 

 

 

Extra Messages

 

• ‘Mission’ Activity for August 2020: Find 6 Social Trends in Health Poverty Alleviation

 

Our link of ‘Mission’ Year/Project to the month of Track, Trip and Trending via ‘Mission’ Activity continues this week.  The ‘Mission’ Activity of this week is to search and find 6 Social Trends in Health Poverty Alleviation and health-enhancing aspects of sustainable development.

We would like to ask to those who are doing it or decide to do it to share their experience about this ‘Mission’ Activity.  Thanks!  

To communicate or share your experience, please contact CENFACS.

 

 

 

• The Review of the African Sahel and Lake Chad Basin Appeals

 

There are similarities and dissimilarities about what is happening in the African Sahel and Lake Chad basin.  The commonality of these situations is insecurity, human displacement, climate change issues, etc.    People have been internally displaced, there are in- and out-of-camp refugees, there is a low level of resilience, extreme poverty is prevailing in the two areas, etc.  This is despite the fact that the two areas have a low number of Covid-19 cases.  Because of the poverty situation in both areas, we are reviewing the two appeals we previously and separately launched for them. 

The purpose of this review will be to evaluate these appeals in the light of the current situations in these two areas.  The review will also tell us whether or not there has been any progress since we first launched these appeals.  There will be stages in this review:  evidence-based process, information, verification of the information provided, analysis, etc.  At the end of this review, we shall decide whether or not to renew our appeal for the two areas.

To discuss or share your views about the African Sahel and Lake Chad Basin, please contact CENFACS.

 

 

• CENFACS Poverty Relief League: Team Countries Replacement Window

 

For those who are playing the CENFACS League of Poverty Relief, please note that there is only little time left for those who want to change or swap the teams.  This is because it takes time to complete the game and decide your best country that has best relieved poverty.

If one wants to change or swap team countries because they are having problems to get the poverty data, especially at this difficult time of the coronavirus pandemic, it is better to do it by the end of this Summer.  This will enable them to still have enough time to get data, analyse them, test them and decide their best poverty-relieving country by the 23rd of December 2020.  

If anyone has any concern or query about Team Countries Replacement, please do not hesitate to contact CENFACS.

 

 

Main Development

 

Annual Review 2019/2020

 

This review aims at explaining to those who are interested in the work CENFACS does to get a glimpse of what happened during the financial year 2019/2020.  It is a summary of our activities, performance, achievements and accounts for the financial year 2019/2020. 

However, before starting this review we would like to mention three factors which were at play during the above stated period and which made the context of our poverty relief work.  They are: life-threatening impacts of climate change, economic uncertainty linked to the exit of the UK from the EU regional economic integration model, and the life-threatening and destroying impacts of the coronavirus pandemic.

 

• • The Contexts of Poverty Reduction of the 2019/2020 Financial Year

 

There are three key factors which affected or impacted our resources, plans and the way we conducted our poverty reduction work, which are:  the changing climate, economic uncertainty and transition, the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent lockdowns.  Like any organisation that could face this type of challenges, we had to develop a strategy or plan on how to approach our work differently during the year knowingly or unknowingly that events beyond our own control were going to happen.

We decided to choose the theme of changing climate since climate change was the dominant factor from the beginning of our financial year.  We did it while still having in mind the economic uncertainty linked to the exit situation of the UK from the EU.  The two factors (climate change and economic exit) were the prevailing external factors of the first part of our financial year. 

The second part of our financial year which literately started from January 2020 was dominated by the economic transition since the economic exit of the UK became clear with the new Government.  Then, the coronavirus pandemic came to largely influence our poverty reduction agenda in the last four months or so. 

Although we organised this review according these three key contexts, one should not think that the factors making them are separate or exclusive.  Let us explain.  When we speak for example about poverty reduction in the context of Covid-19, it does not mean that the climate change factor has disappeared.  We just want to mean and put emphasis on the dominant factor or the factor that impacted us the most at a particular time. 

Having clarified the contexts of work, let us now review our financial year 2019/2020.

   

• • Activities Review

 

This summary covers CENFACS’ financial year 2019-2020, which we started with a July 2019 consultation of our supporters and users about what we did in the last 11 months and two weeks preceding the above named financial year.

 

=> Poverty Reduction Activities in the Context of Changing Climate

 

While this consultation was going on, we organised our usual Summer Festival of Thoughts and Actions, the Seven Days of Development in July.  The Festival of Thoughts was about “How Democratic Transition Can Transform Poor People’s Lives in Africa”.

The Festival helped us to spot the signs of hope for poverty reduction that could be brought by the democratic transformations that were happening in Africa in 2019.  It also gave us the opportunity to think about how the transformations or the change of political climate could make our poverty reduction and the work of our African colleagues easy or stay the same.

We continued to develop CENFACS’ Analytics Dashboard as a project by making it an effective management tool of tasks for our system of poverty reduction.  We did it while delivering other areas of our programmes. 

The year was also about the best response that could be brought to support children living in conflict-stricken and climate change-affected areas in Africa, particularly in the new school year.  Our response was to launch an appeal to support them; which we did.

The context of life-threatening impacts of climate change and of armed conflicts continued to claim more hungry people in Africa.  As a result, we had to step up our Making Zero Hunger Africa campaign.  Likewise, we could not stay silent with what was happening in the 3-Frontier Area of Africa (made of Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger) where people were displaced and fleeing from insecurity and violence in the area.  We set up an appeal for peace and stability to deal with this situation. 

As climate change was and still is an unavoidable factor in any of our work, especially with regard to its impacts on children, we continued to follow up the United Nations Climate Talks.  In December 2019, we followed the Madrid Climate Talks through our Climate Talks Follow-up Project under the advocacy of “Climate Protection and Stake for African Children, Phase 3”with “Madrid Makes It Work“, as our working theme.  To enable us to better follow up these talks in the future we agreed and set up our guiding principles which we summarised in what we called “The Compendium of Climate Advocacy”.  

Since 2019 was dedicated as a “Quadranscentennial” Year at CENFACS, we carried on delivering other areas of the “Q” Project in the last months of the year 2019.

2019/2020 was also the year of the discussions about the Twenty twenties (2020s) Programme.  This is a programme that took over the Twenty tens (2010s) Programme.  We started with these discussions in 2019 and finished them in the early 2020 with a new programme. 

 

=> Poverty Reduction Activities in the Context of Economic Transition

 

As we entered the new decade, there was still the problem of economic transition related to the confirmed exit of the UK from the EU after the election.  This transition affected the way we do our development work and poverty relief work in particular. 

Since our programme of the last decade ran out, we had to make sure that the new programme which was in discussion became a reality.  We had as well to develop new tools to fight poverty in the new decade.  

As a result, we set up the 2020s Poverty Reduction Programme and Development Agenda.  We also assembled various tools of poverty reduction system into a box to make up a Poverty Relief Tools Box.  In doing so, this would help us to deal with poverty reduction more effectively than in the situation where these tools are used separately.

 

=> Poverty Reduction Activities in the Context of Life-threatening Impacts of Covid-19

 

While we were trying to deal with economic transition of the UK’s exit from the EU, a new global economic and health threat emerged, the coronavirus pandemic.  This pandemic with the lockdown it has generated forced us to reorganise all our work like everybody did in the sector. 

We had to entirely go out our way to reinvent new tools to fight the coronavirus-induced poverty and vulnerability.  As a result, we developed a Cube of Protection against the coronavirus.  The cube contains most our munitions against the life-threatening and destroying impacts that the coronavirus has posed and still poses.  Besides that we had to stage a new campaign, the Covid-19 Campaign (or the Campaign for resilience against the Coronavirus Pandemic).

As part of our emergency and contingency plans, we had to reorganise both the Spring and Summer 2020 themes of our poverty relief work.   Life-salvation and healthiness came to dominate the Spring and Summer agendas respectively. 

We started the 2019/2020 financial year with democratic transitions as hopes for freedom from poverty in Africa, and we ended up the same year with healthiness as we continued to deal with sanitation poverty and the other far-reaching impacts of the coronavirus pandemic in our poverty reduction work and the lives of beneficiaries.

 

• • Achievements

 

We would be indebted if we end this review without mentioning or adding to the above summary of work carried out these three achievements:

 

(1) A new poverty reduction programme and development agenda

 

The 2020s Development Agenda is a series of processes and tools defining the 2020s development framework that will enable CENFACS deliver its poverty reduction goals.  It is also a summary and coherent list of the issues and challenges that poor people are facing in 2020 and will face throughout the 2020s; issues and challenges that need to be addressed in order to reduce and end poverty in Africa.

CENFACS’ 2020s Poverty Reduction Programme, which is a group or package of related projects and activities organised in a coordinated fashion to reduce and possibly end poverty, aims at identifying and reaching out to extremely poor and help them out of poverty through sustainable development means. 

The new agenda and programme will take into account the needs of our users and beneficiaries in the new development landscape and in the new Age of the coronavirus pandemic.

 

(2) CENFACS’ Compendium of Climate Advocacy

 

This Compendium is our guiding principles that are summarised in terms of what CENFACS and its beneficiaries would like the climate community (like the one gathering on annual basis to talk about climate change, the Conference of the Parties) to achieve for children, particularly but not exclusively African children, in terms of outcomes.

 

(3) CENFACS’ Cube of Protection against the coronavirus pandemic

 

This Cube brings together coronavirus-related initiatives that are intended to help poor, vulnerable people and incapacitated Africa-based organisations.  

 

• • Performance review

 

In terms of our performance this year, we would like to let you know that our cash funds continue their upwards trend passing from 22% in 2018/19 to 33% in 2019/2020 financial year.  However, in this net improvement there is a mix story picture brought by the coronavirus in our finances in the last four months of our financial year 2019/2020.  On one hand, we made some savings; on the other hand there is a different type of costs that have appeared. 

Because of the coronavirus and the lockdown effects, we were able to save on our payments accounts on items such as physical networking and meetings, transport and travel, postage stamps, outreach, printing and photocopying.  While these savings were made, there was appearance of other types of costs which were existing since we went digital a few years ago, but which became more pronounced by the end of our financial year 2019/2020. 

This appearance and increase was attributable to online and virtual way of working to counteract the adverse impacts of the coronavirus.  This led to additional investment in online and virtual technologies and infrastructures as we were trying to respond to an unprecedented health crisis and finding other ways of still helping to reduce poverty and hardships. 

In all, the savings made were higher than the increase in online and virtual costs.  We managed to control our finances despite the coronavirus-led economic and health adverse effects.  We did what we could in the midst of the pandemic to meet our key performance targets and indicators. 

  

• • Thank you

 

The work of CENFACS is a collective endeavour that relies upon the voluntary contribution of others, a key to our success.  As such, there is a number of people and organisations who contributed to the realisation of our financial year 2019-2020. 

We would like to indiscriminately acknowledge them.  Without their helpful support, we would not be able to achieve the above.  We are grateful to our volunteers, users, website/blog readers and supporters. 

Furthermore, we would like to acknowledge those who posted their comments and responded to our advocacy appeals and other development campaigns. 

We would like to thank all of them for their unwavering commitment and impactful support for helping us to voice and bring once again our poverty reduction message into the world in development, especially at the very difficult time of the coronavirus pandemic and economic recession.

Many thanks for making 2019-2020 another deservingly memorable year at CENFACS.

 

Help CENFACS keep the Poverty Relief work going in 2020.

We do our work on a very small budget and on a voluntary basis.  Making a donation will show us you value our work and support CENFACS’ work, which is currently offered as a free service. 

One could consider a recurring donation to CENFACS in the future.

Donate to support CENFACS!

 

FOR ONLY £1, YOU CAN SUPPORT CENFACS AND CENFACS’ PROJECTS, JUST GO TO http://cenfacs.org.uk/supporting-us/

Thank you for visiting CENFACS website and reading this post.

Thank you as well to those who made or make comments about our weekly posts.

We look forward to receiving your regular visits and continuing support throughout 2020 and beyond.

With many thanks.

 

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Summer 2020 Humanitarian Relief Appeal Projects

Welcome to CENFACS’ Online Diary!

19 August 2020

 

Post No. 157

 

 

The Week’s Contents

 

• The Continuation of Summer 2020 Humanitarian Relief Appeal Projects

• Summer Triple Pack is Still Running

• Trending in Poverty Reduction in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance – In Focus from Week Beginning 17/08/2020: Social Health as Enabler of Poverty Reduction

 

… and much more!

 

 

 

 

Key Messages

 

• The Continuation of Summer 2020 Humanitarian Relief Appeal Projects

 

The remaining four projects of our Summer 2020 Humanitarian Relief Appeal are now open for public support.  We have made them Covid-19 secure after conducting a planning review and test on them.  

Under the Main Development section of this post, there are key summaries about them.  CENFACS is willing to provide the full project proposals to those potential supporters who may request them.   

To support and or further enquire about them, just contact CENFACS.

 

 

 

 

• Summer Triple Pack is Still Running

 

Our Summer Triple Pack made of Track, Trip and Trending continues this week.  The key message we would like to get across this Triple Pack is to try to help reduce poverty by undertaking any of these three activities: running, visiting projects and analysing trends.  Let us make some reminding points about each of them.

 

=> Social distancing Track to help reduce sanitation poverty

 

This activity of the pack is about social distancing running for about 2.5 miles (almost 4 km) to help reduce poverty in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance.

For those who have completed their 2.5 miles of running, please do not hesitate to share with us your experience.  This activity is also performed under this August 2020 Mission Activity.

For those who are deprived to physically run, they can virtually run to help reduce poverty with CENFACS.  Among them are people who may be experiencing handicap to do physical activity of running to help reduce poverty.  One could include the following:

People or parents caring for very young children, pregnant women, elderly people, disable people, those who are not physically fit or mobile to run, those who do not have opportunity to physically run, etc. 

If you are organising this kind of virtual activity or event, let us know.  It is also better to advise us that the people participating in the virtual run are the physically deprived ones we listed above or they have a serious handicap prohibiting them to undertake any physical engagement.  

In all cases, Covid-19 restrictions, rules and guidance must be observed.

 

=> Virtual Trip to Covid-19 hit locals

 

As part of ‘Mission’ Activity of the month, we have suggested to virtually visit 3 projects related to Covid-19 hit local people and communities. 

These virtual visits are not only online recreational activity.  They are also a learning and development process in terms of understanding the following:

√ The way in which Covid-19 hit people or communities, particularly those who are undertaking coping and survival strategies to eradicate Covid-19-induced poverty and vulnerability

√ What is needed to help them overcome the problems they have

√ What lessons that can be learnt and shared from their coronavirus pandemic experience

√ The demand in terms of policy development and response to meet similar needs in the future

Furthermore, Virtual Trip as part of our Summer Triple Pack has now included field work research in Africa and anywhere else in the context of poverty relief and sustainable development projects. 

For those who are having or have had these experiences and results of field work research, please do not hesitate to share them.

 

=> Online Trending in health poverty reduction

 

The focus for this third part of our Summer Triple Pack is on social health and social wellness.  Under this activity of the pack, we are following the direction of poverty through socials and virtual world.

After dealing with Social Distancing Rule as Life Protector and Saver in the first week, and Social Networking as Connector for Poverty Reduction in the second week; we are now working on Social Health as Enabler of Poverty Reduction.  The notes about this third activity are just below.

In all this Summer Triple Pack, Covid-19 restrictions and rules must be followed, respected and maintained.

 

 

• Trending in Poverty Reduction in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance – In Focus from Week Beginning 17/08/2020: Social Health as Enabler of Poverty Reduction

 

Social health can enable to reduce poverty and enhance sustainable development.  But, what is social health?

 

=> Understanding social health

 

There are many definitions of social health.  In these many definitions, we have selected the following definition that has been given by Health Insurance Fund (HIF) of Australia on its website.  The HIF and Tammy George of HIF (1) define social health as

‘our ability to interact and form meaningful relationship with others’   

The HIF and Tammy George further argue that

‘social health is related to how comfortably we can adapt in social situations’

From the above definition, it is possible to follow the direction of poverty reduction through the ability of people to interact and form meaningful relationships with others.  In other words, it is possible to track the route of poverty reduction to check if social health is enabling people to reduce poverty or not.

 

=> Social health as enabler of poverty reduction

 

A good social health can enable poverty reduction and lead to happiness.  With reference to the successive World Happiness Reports edited by Helliwell et al. (2), one can argue that social health is part of the six key variables or predictors that explain happiness differences among countries which include: income (Gross Domestic Product per capita), healthy life expectancy at birth, social support (having someone to count on in times of trouble), generosity, freedom to make life choices and trust (perceptions of corruption).  

Social health can mean social support, that is one has someone to count on in times of trouble.  For example, one can look at how people in the CENFACS Community are socially healthy and well enough during the times of Covid-19 and lockdown.  Are they engaging with others (virtually or online or via phone) in the community to look after each other?

 

=> How do we measure the contribution of social health to poverty reduction?

 

We are as well looking at the measures of social health and wellness including the multi-dimensional measures of well-being, while following the direction of poverty linked to poor social health.  One of the measures could be the number of people engaged with in the CENFACS Community.

We are also trying to deal with the social dimensions of health and illness.  In this respect, it is worth to understand what is ill-health? 

In the Oxford Dictionary of Sociology written by J. Scott and G. Marshall (3), ill-health is defined as

‘a bodily or mental state that is deemed undesirable’ (p. 302)

So, following the direction of poverty reduction via social health can help us to understand ill-health from the social and sociological points of view.  It can as well help us to understand our own social health (social state of being) and our social wellness (social state of living a healthy lifestyle), especially at these times of Covid-19 and repeated lockdowns.    

For further details and to follow the direction of poverty via social health, please contact CENFACS.

 

(1) https://blog.hif.com.au/mental-health/what-is-social-health-definitions-example-and-tips-on-improving-your-social-wellness (accessed August 2020)

(2) Helliwell, J., Layard, R., Sachs, J. (2017, 2018 & 2019), World Happiness Reports (2017, 2018 & 2019), New York: Sustainable Development Solutions Network

(3) Scott, J. and Marshall, G, (2009), Oxford Dictionary of Sociology, Oxford University Press Inc., New York

 

 

 

 

Extra Messages

 

• Summer TRIPS to volunteer for needy people and communities in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance

 

These are the kinds of experiences we expect people to do over the Summer period especially for those who want to spend their Summer time differently, particularly but not exclusively, by doing something about poverty.  These experiences include field service activities carried out when visiting a project and which people can report their findings. 

We recommend this type of experiences under our volunteering scheme known as All in Development Volunteers Scheme (AiDVS).   Under CENFACS’ AiDV Scheme, one can take seasonal opportunities like of Summer to volunteer or do some internship on poverty relief and sustainable development. 

Where the person decides to go far away to visit needy communities or volunteer to our Africa-based projects, CENFACS would facilitate and liaise with its Africa-based Sister Organisations where the projects are based to smooth the volunteering process or visits to the projects under mutually agreed arrangements and conditions.

This Summer has been particular with the risk of the coronavirus pandemic.  It is difficult for many of those who planned to undertake volunteering trips.  The Covid-19 lockdown and the related travel restrictions are not making things easy.  Many of All in Development Volunteers and self-funded volunteers could not travel or simply cancel their Summer volunteering plans because of the coronavirus pandemic. 

For those who still manage to volunteer or visit projects according their plans, one can hope that everything is going to their plans.  Most importantly, one could expect them to stay safe and healthy. 

In order to fill up the volunteering gap, we have advised people to undertake virtual trips to the need and community for projects that are open during this difficult time and where things can be virtually organised between the virtual volunteers and the organisation/project to be virtually visited.   In this respect, Covid-19 hit people and communities could be obvious one to virtually visit.    

For details about AiDVS, contact CENFACS.  If you have visited or volunteered for projects recently and would like to share with us your experience, please contact us as well.

 

 

 

• Climate Protection and Stake for African Children (CPSAC) – Phase 3, with Glasgow Steps It Up as our working theme

 

It is known that the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26), which was initially scheduled from 9 to 20 November 2020, will be held from 1 to 12 November 2021, due to the coronavirus pandemic. 

Despite this postponement, our CPSAC – P. 3 continues.  We have rescheduled our plan and work so that we can still follow it through our working theme of “Glasgow Steps It Up”.  Also, this postponement gives us an opportunity to take into account and clearly assess the Covid-19 impact on CPSAC – P. 3.  In particular, we hope to collect more data about the Covid-19 and climate impacts on children.

In meantime, we are continuing to follow any meaningful climate discussions prior to the COP26, while working on the various aspects of our CPSAC – P. 3 as stated in the Compendium of CENFACS’ Climate Advocacy.  A new schedule of activities for the key points of this Compendium will be set up as we move towards the COP 26 in the next year.

For further information about the CPSAC – P. 3 and the Compendium of CENFACS’ Climate Advocacy project, please do not hesitate to contact CENFACS.

 

 

 

 

• The Great Beasts Campaign

 

The Great Beasts campaign (GBC), which extends Big Cats campaign, aims at helping to protect endangered species such as African elephants, rhinoceros from extinction and exploitation.   This protection is even relevant at the Covid-19 time as the economic effects of this virus pandemic do not only hit humans.  They also impact on animals’ living and welfare. 

Like humans, animals need shelter, food, drink, healthcare, protection, etc.   At this difficult time of economic recession led by the Covid-19, the Great Beasts (that is elephant, rhinoceros, leopard, lion and buffalo) could be neglected or simply be exploited despite the various international conventions on the protection of endangered animal species.  In addition to Covid-19 economic effects, there is still the impact of climate change that continues to threaten the Great Beasts in Africa and elsewhere, their life and habitat. 

So, as part of our Great Beasts Campaign, we are working on the economic effects of Covid-19 as well as the climate change impacts on the Great Beasts of Africa.  This GBC will be carried on until we restart our ‘a la une’ (Autumn Leaves of Action for the Upkeep of the Nature in Existence) campaign this coming Autumn.

For further about the Great Beasts Campaign, please contact CENFACS.

 

 

 

Main Development

 

Summer 2020 Humanitarian Relief Appeal Projects

 

• • Projects making this appeal

 

The following are the remaining Summer Humanitarian Relief Appeal Projects which we would like people to consider for support: 

All Gifts for All Coronavirus-affected Poor in Africa, International Networking and Protection against Covid-19, Iconic Young Carer for a Coronavirus-free Environment and ‘Covid-19 Secure’ ELCLASSICO International.

We have included in them the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

 

• • • All Gifts for All Coronavirus-affected Poor in Africa

 

AG4ACP, which stands for All Gifts for All Coronavirus-affected Poor in Africa, is the holiday makers’ and travellers’ free and voluntary contribution to poverty relief in Africa via CENFACS

Many people around the world (in both developed and developing countries) have been affected by the various impacts of Covid-19 and lockdowns.  However, the effects of the coronavirus pandemic and lockdown are disproportional on and between people and communities.  In Africa, this disproportionality is big as those who are poor may not receive the support they need at this difficult time.

AG4ACP is an appeal to give a gift to the coronavirus-affected poor people in Africa. 

For those who can, we are asking them to support our appeal to give a gift in kind or money to support those poor people suffering from the astronomic effects of the Covid-19 and lockdown.  Your gift can help them to buy products (like personal protective equipment) to protect against Covid-19 or just access the basic necessities to survive during this difficult time.

 

• • • International Networking and Protection against Covid-19

 

INPC (International Networking and Protection against Covid-19) is designed to help and support vulnerably poor children to escape from HARMS, THREATS, ATTACKS, EXTREMISMS, RADICALISATION and RISKS of any forms of exploitation, neglect and abuse in Africa.  At this time of the coronavirus crisis, these threats and risks are higher than ever before.

To win the fight over the above dangers children in Africa and elsewhere are facing, it requires winning the battle of communication via the flow of information.  Likewise, the fight against Covid-19 requires an international collaboration and exchange of information between all those who are working on poverty relief and sustainable development.  Furthermore, defence against harms, danger and threats from Covid-19, is being done internationally as Covid-19 is a global issue.

You can support this appeal by helping in networking and protection equipment to enable Africa-based Organisations to better access information about Covid-19 to protect people and communities.  Your support can help to raise awareness and take action against the forces of exploitation and destruction of children.

 

• • • Iconic Young Carer for a Coronavirus-free Environment

 

IYCCC (Iconic Young Carer for a Coronavirus-free Environment), which is a deserving cause that supports poor children and young people who prematurely become African caregivers and labourers because of poverty, aims at improving the quality of life of young caregivers and labourers by responding to their basic needs and human rights.

A Covid-19-free environment requires the efforts of everybody.  In these collective efforts, young carers have been forced to take this role side by side with adults.  They are often doing it free and without any financial help.   These young carers deserve support as well.

So, supporting these young carers mean both fighting Covid-19 and preserving the lives of future generations. 

You can donate whatever you can to support these iconic young carers for a coronavirus-free environment in Africa.  Your donation can help to pay for the educational and developmental costs of these poor children who prematurely become young caregivers and labourers.

 

• • • ‘Covid-19 Secure’ ELCLASSICO International

 

ELCLASSICO International is a CENFACS combined Sports Development, Child Protection and Sustainable Development initiative that aims at reducing child and youth poverty, while protecting children and bringing a better change to impoverished people, communities, children, young people and future generations in Africa.

To organise any sports development activity and sustainability activity for children, these activities must be ‘Covid-19 Secure’ and child protected.  It means that in the preparation of these activities, some Covid-19 and child protection tests must be conducted.  So, integrating Covid-19 restrictions and rules will help to protect these activities and everybody involves in them.   

It is known that at the moment, most of sporting events like the ones related to the ELCLASSICO International project are banned or postponed because of the coronavirus pandemic; just as children activities have been banned at the moment for the same reason.  Concerning the sports development part of ‘Covid-19 Secure’ ELCLASSICO International, it is on hold.  However, the sustainability part may be continuing.

You can support this project to rehabilitate the physical part of this project while enabling the sustainability aspect to function under the Covid-19 rules and restrictions where this project would be implemented. 

Your giving will have a triple effect:

√ Protection of children, young people and their families from Covid-19

√ Their sensitisation about climate change and environmental issues

√ Support of their development through sporting activities and other events.

 

Donation or Giving in Kind Regarding Summer 2020 Humanitarian Relief Appeal Projects

 

Due to the Covid-19 and lockdown effects, there is no limit in terms of minimum and maximum amount to donate. 

You can donate and or support the way it suits you and your affordability. 

CENFACS will accept any amount to be given or donated.

For those who would like to make a donation in kind, it will be a good idea to check with us that what they are giving will help to meet the above stated needs.   This will help to save time, money and the environment for both sides.

Thank you in anticipation for your willingness to make helpful difference to these poor children, young people and families at this difficult time of Covid-19.

For more details about ways of supporting the above initiatives and other ones, please go http://cenfacs.org.uk/supporting-us/

 

Help CENFACS keep the Poverty Relief work going in 2020.

We do our work on a very small budget and on a voluntary basis.  Making a donation will show us you value our work and support CENFACS’ work, which is currently offered as a free service. 

One could consider a recurring donation to CENFACS in the future.

Donate to support CENFACS!

 

FOR ONLY £1, YOU CAN SUPPORT CENFACS AND CENFACS’ PROJECTS, JUST GO TO http://cenfacs.org.uk/supporting-us/

Thank you for visiting CENFACS website and reading this post.

Thank you as well to those who made or make comments about our weekly posts.

We look forward to receiving your regular visits and continuing support throughout 2020 and beyond.

With many thanks.

 

Leave a comment

FACS, Issue No. 68: Essential Economy That Relieves Poverty In Africa

Welcome to CENFACS’ Online Diary!

12 August 2020

 

Post No. 156

 

 

The Week’s Contents

 

• FACS, Issue No. 68: Essential Economy That Relieves Poverty In Africa

• Trending in Poverty Reduction in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance, In Focus from Week Beginning 10/08/2020: Social Networking as Connector…

• Planning Review of Summer 2020 Humanitarian Relief Appeal Projects

 

… and much more!

 

 

Key Messages

 

• FACS, Issue No. 68: Essential Economy That Relieves Poverty in Africa 

 

The top content of this week’s post is the Essential Economy That Relieves Poverty In Africa. This top content makes the 68th Issue of FACS, CENFACS’ bilingual newsletter.

 

Introductory Notes to the 68th Issue of FACS

 

The 68th Issue starts by clearing the way in making the difference between essential economy and the essentialist vision of the economy in Page 2.  In doing so, it sets clear the goalposts or the direction of travel in helping us to understand how essential economy as a revived economic model can help reduce poverty in Africa.

It then goes on in highlighting the role of Africa-based Sister Organisations in the essential economy, especially in the restoration of local production and in helping reduce poverty and enhance sustainable development at the time of the coronavirus pandemic.  It also stresses the importance of charitable activities in the post-Covid-19 recovery period.

The issue shows us that although essential economy is not an end of itself, it can be a solution to poverty problems in Africa if a pan-African supply chain of essential commodities can be established.

As usual, we have our two pages (5 & 6) in French.  The two pages are a kind of digest of the Newsletter FACS (of the 68th Issue) in French as they condense what is said in English by retelling it in French in a few and other words. 

Page 5 highlights the essentialness of networking and the renewal of engagement by African organisations to their project beneficiaries via essential economy. 

Page 6 speaks about the role of essential economy in the process of building back better Africa in the post-coronavirus era, while looking at essential economy as a way of connecting people to the local essential.

Our coverage of the 68th Issue also includes the caring attributes of essential economy as an economy that serves the poor and does not leave anyone behind.  An essential economic project (“Essentia” Project) concludes this Issue in Page 10.

Besides these introductory notes to the Issue, there are key summaries of the pages making the 68th Issue of FACS, which can be found under the Main Development section of this post.  They shade more lights about this lead content.

 

 

• Trending in Poverty Reduction in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance

In Focus from Week Beginning 10/08/2020: Social Networking as Connector for Poverty Reduction and Sustainable Development

 

To run this second note of our trending activity, we will start with the definition of social networking.  To define it, we are going to use a simple online and non-academic definition given by the website www.investopedia.com.    

This website defines social networking as

“the use of internet-based social media sites [e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and Instagram] to stay connected with friends, family, colleagues, customers, or clients” (1)

One can refer to this definition and follow the social purpose of social networking. 

For example, one can follow how people are trying to reduce poverty and hardships they are experiencing through the use of social media platforms.  Likewise, people could share poverty relief stories, sustainable development opportunities, tales about recycling items, etc.  They can exchange information about jobs and accommodation while improving their skills about healthcare by following the Covid-19 messages or videos to protect against the virus.   

One can do their own evaluation of the use of social networking to find out if what they exchange with others has to do with poverty reduction and sustainable development or not.  In other words, they can assess if their social media connection leads to poverty reduction and sustainable development or not.     

These are the kinds of experiences that are interesting in following the social networking as a connector from the perspective of our trending activity.  It can connect those in need to a variety of information and resources to help them reduce poverty and enhance sustainable development.

So, we are continuing in following the direction of socials through social networking in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance. 

To follow this trend with CENFACS or to discuss it, please contact CENFACS.

 

 

 

• Planning Review of Summer 2020 Humanitarian Relief Appeal Projects

 

We are now nearly ready to add these projects to our Summer Humanitarian Relief Appeal Campaign as their planning review has been completed.  These projects include the following:

 

√ All Gifts for All Coronavirus-affected Poor

√ Iconic Young Career for a Coronavirus-free Environment

√ International Networking& Protection against Covid-19

√ ‘Covid-19 Secure’ ELCLASSICO International

 

They are now Covid-19 proof.

For further details and to support any of them, just contact CENFACS.

 

 

Extra Messages

 

• Online TRACK to CENFACS e-charity Summer Shop for Summer Goods Donations and Buys

 

Every season is an opportunity to do something about the environment and poverty.  You can recycle or donate your unwanted or unused goods and presents to do something about the environment and or poverty.  You can also buy goods to meet the same ends.

This Summer you can online track CENFACS e-charity shop to help the environment and poverty relief.  If you are a fun of online tracking and shopping, you can take an online course of action or online path or even course of travel to save the environment and reduce poverty with CENFACS.

Instead of you physically going to physically shop or donate your goods, you can from the comfort of your home buy or donate goods to CENFACS e-charity shop to help the deserving cause of poverty relief and sustainable development.

To support us either by shopping or supplying us with products or goods you no longer want or use so that we can sell and raise the money for the good cause of poverty relief, please go http://cenfacs.org.uk/shop/

 

 

 

• Virtual Trips for Field Research

 

Trips to the local need this week include as well those travels made or to be made to conduct field work research in Africa and anywhere else in the context of poverty relief and sustainable development projects. 

Because of the coronavirus pandemic and the lockdowns it has generated, we recommend to those who want do trips for field work research to only do them virtually.  In exceptional circumstances whereby people have to physically visit coronavirus-affected people or related projects, it is in the interest of everybody that they wear appropriate personal protective equipment to protect themselves and others against the Covid-19.  They should also follow local, national and international rules related to the protection against Covid-19 such as social and physical distancing rules, personal hygiene (washing of hands with soaps at least 20 seconds), disinfecting of their own properties if they have been in any site, etc.

These field work researches or practical experiences to gain knowledge and skills could be of varying forms such as observation and collection of raw data, interviews, group discussions, practical activities to support overseas development projects, etc. 

If you are a researcher and did or are doing some field work research on sustainable development and poverty reduction, and think that your work can enhance CENFACS’ work, you could share with us your experience, research findings or outcomes.

To share the experiences and results of your field work research, just contact CENFACS and CENFACS will get back to you.

 

 

 

• Mission Activity about Social Distancing Run to Reduce Poverty in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance

 

As part of CENFACS’ Mission Activity, you can virtually run or walk from any location you choose, including home.  You can run, jog, or walk on the road, on the trail, on the treadmill, at the gym or on the track (or even at another race).  You can run your own race, at your own pace, and time it yourself.

Again, one should follow the Covid-19 restrictions and guidance in order to protect themselves and the members of the public and those around them.

All we are asking in this Mission Activity is to complete 4 Km Run wherever you want to do them.  To do it, you need to wear the recommended personal protective equipment and to observe the social distancing rules.  Before doing it, please let CENFACS know.

 

 

Main Development

 

FACS, Issue No. 68: Essential Economy That Relieves Poverty in Africa

 

• • Page summaries (p. 2 – p. 10)

The following are the key summaries of each page making the contents of the 68th Issue of FACS.

 

The difference between essential economy and essentialist vision of the economy in the fight against poverty (p. 2)

 

The literature review about essential economy shows that there are no many definitions about it.  There are definitions of essential economy that are linked to the situation of lockdown.  Some use a pragmatic or circumstantial definition to define essential economy as ‘any economic activity that has been allowed to stay open and functioning during the period of lockdown of the economy linked to the coronavirus pandemic’. 

The above politically-oriented definition has some anomalies or irregularities as it is restrictive and timely limited.  Essential economy should not only be defined with reference to the lockdown as this was an exceptional or temporary situation.  Yet, essential economy is the economy of everyday.  We heard it from people saying this: buy only what is essential.  But what does essential economy really mean?

Understanding essential economy

To understand essential economy, we are going to refer to a dictionary definition of the economy and link this definition to the word essential.  This definition has been chosen because not everybody making CENFACS’ audience is an economist or understands complex economic jargons. 

Collins English Dictionary (2) defines economy as

‘the system by which the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services is organised in a country or community’ (p. 267). 

This system can become essential if it is based on absolutely important or indispensable goods and services for life sustenance.  This system can then operate at any time and does not need the time of lockdown to be made relevant.  Because it is based on what is essential or fundamental to maintain any life, it is close to those who are in most need to maintain their life, the poor and neediest.

Essential economy is different from the essentialist economic view

Arguing about the need of essential economy is different from having an essentialist view of the economy.  Essential economy is different from essentialist vision of the economy, just as one should make a difference between protection and protectionism. 

Indeed, the essentialist thinking of the economy is the belief or doctrine that the different entities or components of the economy have their attributes that make them what they are or their essence.  This kind of way of thinking can lead to status quo.  If one thinks like this, there will not be any progress in the reduction of poverty. 

In order to reduce poverty, one needs to remove both ideological or mental and material barriers that keep poor people always poor.  If one wants to reduce and end poverty, one needs to make progress in their thinking or mind set. 

So, we are approaching essential economy from the perspective of reducing poverty and sustainable development while recognising positive aspects of the essentialist theories or bodies of analysis.    Our approach is an economic and sustainable development one in the fight against poverty and hardships.  In this respect, our view lies in the progress of the essential economy in its capacity to pull out people out of poverty.  It is this view which has been reflected in the different parts of the contents of the 68th Issue of FACS.

Below you find more contents about this Issue.

 

 

Africa-based Sister Organisations, Essential Local Production and Natural Resources (p. 3)

 

The experience of Covid-19, which is still to come, in restricting local people to shop locally and in accessing products, is in itself a call for Africa-based Sister Organisations (ASOs) working in the field of production to have a local focus, while preserving natural resources in the fight against poverty and hardships.

Some people can see it as a post-coronavirus strategy.  However, in a realistic world local production should be part of any efforts to reduce and end poverty.  Whether it is part or not of a post-coronavirus strategy, ASOs can work with their beneficiaries to restore essential local production sometimes destroyed or disregarded because of a number of reasons or factors such as armed conflicts, environmental decay, climate change, pressure from global businesses (like multinational corporations, etc.) in search of sources of natural resources.  They can do it while working on the preservation of natural resources in the fight against poverty and hardships.        

There are many examples whereby ASOs are trying to restore essential local production in rural areas while helping local people to stay home during the lockdown in many African countries.  These examples of local production include: home-made facial masks, craft-made soaps and sanitising products to slow the spread of the coronavirus and protect local community health.  In this process, they involve the preservation of natural resources by using only what is essential for this type of local production.

For further details and examples about this ASOs model of restoring local essential production while caring for the environment, please do not hesitate to contact CENFACS

 

Sustainability of Essential Charitable Activities Run by Africa-based Organisations in the Post-Covid-19 Era (p. 3)

 

The question that one may be asking and trying to answer could be this one: How to maintain essential charitable activities in order to stay open and sustain locally in the post-Covid-19 era?

Charities are part of the essential economy, especially those working for the relief of poverty and hardships.  Many of them run essential activities such as helping …

a) the homeless

b) the poor to access safe drinking water, primary healthcare and education

c) those in most need of food and drink

d) the unemployed people, refugees and asylum seekers, etc.  

During the lockdown, there has been a soaring level of financial hardships and charities that work on financial advice can enormously help with advice. 

During the Covid-19 outbreak and lockdown, there have been a lot of discussions about what is essential and what is non-essential.  Given what has been said earlier, many of the activities run by charities are essential as they are absolutely important for the lifeline of those in need of them and who need them the most.  Yet, many of their activities have been shut down because of the adverse effects and impacts of Covid-19 and the lockdown. 

One could hope that in the post-Covid-19 area, the deserving activities that charities (like those of ASOs with charitable status) will be properly appreciated in keeping their place within the essential sector or economy.

 

The Supply Chain of Essential Commodities and Progress on Poverty Relief in Africa (p. 4)

 

Covid-19 has exposed the extreme vulnerability of Africa to the international supply chains of goods and services including those on which poor people depend upon.  Redeveloping the continental supply chain of essential and critical commodities that poor people can access and improve their life outcomes and chances will help progress the relief and end of poverty. 

In this respect, the Africa Continental Free Trade Agreement needs to include a great deal of essential economy.  This African model of continental free trade agreement could have that part of the economy that is closer to the poor and those in most needs.  As many studies suggested, this model of working together can have trade corridors that allow the free flow of essential economic commodities (or goods and services) to both mitigate the Covid-19 impacts and poverty.  This continental free trade model would be better than the temporary lifting of tariffs on essential products and services. 

So, the supply chain of essential goods and services can be improved under a wide model of working together so that poor people can access essential goods and services at any time (Covid-19 and no Covid-19 times).  This way, progress on poverty relief in Africa can be made widely and regardless of the Covid-19 situation. 

Further discussion on this topic can be addressed to CENFACS.

 

Making Essential Economy as a Solution to Poverty Problems (p. 4)

 

There are many discourses and models or solutions to poverty.  In the context of this Issue, solving the problem of poverty could mean providing to poor people essential economic means to fight and sustain against poverty.  These means could include: essential education, health, housing, employment, energy, income, consumption, skills, knowledge, opportunity, etc. 

In all these matters, it is all about what constitutes the essence of them.  Let’s take essential health, what is the essence of it or what is absolutely important for people to enjoy the kind of health that can be called indispensable.  Let’s take another example like of essential housing: what constitutes essential living.

So, essential economy can provide solutions to poverty by providing to people essential accommodation, level of education, monetary income, sanitation, skills to find jobs, etc.  It is an economy that has a real essence like in the theories of modalities.  It is possible to make essential economy as a solution to poverty and hardships.

 

Is Essential Economy a Gender Affair in Africa? (p. 4)

 

Where our Africa-based Sister Organisations operate, essential economy does not choose between men and women.  Both men and women make up the essential economic system.  There is no such difference being a man or woman trying to produce and consume within this system.  In this respect, essential economy is not gender-biased.  

However, one can hear some saying that these activities are essential for women or for men.  This could be related to the gender role in the society rather than a difference by virtue of essence of the economy.  In other words, by essence the essential economic system is not engendered to create difference between men and women in Africa.  If there is any gender disparity, it is not because the essential economy in itself is a gender affair by essence or nature.  In fact, one of the virtues of essential economy is the caring of others.  If one cares about others, they would not create a disparity against them.

Briefly, it is possible to argue that the essential economy does not discriminate between men and women as both need essential goods and services.  If there is a gender disparity as far as the essential economy is concerned, this will not be to do with the nature of essential economy, but will be to do with humans’ own makings and behaviours. 

For those who would like to further discuss this matter of essential economy and gender disparity, they can let CENFACS know.

 

Organisations africaines et leurs engagements sur l’économie essentielle  (p. 5)

 

L’une des leçons à tirer du coronavirus est sur la capacité des organisations africaines à renouveler leurs engagements respectifs avec les bénéficiaires sur le plan de l’économie essentielle.  Ce renouveau des engagements aura des effets bénéfiques pour les deux parties (organisations et projet bénéficiaires). 

Le renouvellement des engagements à travers le modèle de l’économie essentielle peut permettre de réaliser plus de résultats en matière de réduction de la pauvreté et de faire des avancées sur la réalisation des objectifs du développement durable. 

En effet, la crise du coronavirus a montré les limites de l’économie non-essentielle sur beaucoup de plans surtout sur celui de réduction de la pauvreté.  Ces limites sont entre autres  le non-essentiel qui pousse au gaspillage des ressources, et en particulier celui des ressources naturelles et rares.  Ce non-essentiel ne fournit pas toujours des biens et services utiles à la réduction de la pauvreté. 

En gros, en revalorisant le modèle de l’économie essentielle auprès de leurs usagers, cela permettre de préserver ensemble les acquis et réaliser davantage de résultats sur la réduction de la pauvreté.  Cette  revalorisation passera par la préparation ensemble des projets économiques essentiels visant à la réduction de la pauvreté.

 

Les organisations africaines, le réseautage en ligne et la réduction de la pauvreté (p. 5)

 

Il y a plusieurs manières d’appréhender le concept de « réseau ».  Dans le cadre de cet article, nous l’appréhendons à  travers les flux d’informations et de données que les organisations africaines échangent avec les autres membres de leurs réseaux. 

L’établissement et le développement des flux d’informations et de données sur les réseaux sociaux avec les mêmes parties participantes à ces réseaux peuvent permettre de réaliser davantage de résultats collectifs sur la réduction de la pauvreté.  Etant donné que nous sommes dans une situation de la pandémie de coronavirus, des tels flux et liens intégreraient le facteur sanitaire lié au Covid-19, si l’on veut qu’ils soient efficaces.  Ces réseaux d’échange et de partage des informations et données sur le Covid-19 et sur les expériences en matière de réduction de la pauvreté seront un cadre idéal dans un monde et une Afrique où les distanciations sociales et confinements causés par le coronavirus ont démontré les limites du modèle de réseaux basé sur les contacts humains physiques.

En bref, les organisations africaines peuvent utiliser les vertus du réseautage en ligne pour non seulement échanger des informations entre elles, mis aussi pour se protéger contre le Covid-19 et partager des expériences de réduction de la pauvreté qu’offre le secteur essentiel.  

 

Mieux reconstruire l’Afrique après le Covid-19 (p. 6)

 

Mieux reconstruire l’Afrique de l’après Covid-19 implique l’inclusion de l’économie essentielle aussi.  Pendant la crise du coronavirus et la période du confinement, l’économie essentielle est devenue l’économie courante ou la règle du jeu de tous les jours du confinement.  L’économie non-essentielle quant à elle, elle a été reléguée au banc des économies d’exception ou des réserves. 

Si les organisations africaines veulent vraiment mieux reconstruire l’Afrique après le Covid-19, alors il y a lieu qu’elles pensent à rehausser la place et la valeur de l’économie essentielle au même piédestal que les autres économies.  En effet, l’économie essentielle a fait ses preuves par exemple en matière d’approvisionnement des produits et services essentiels pour toutes les catégories de revenus (modeste, essentiel, moyen, élevé, etc.).  Elle a su démontrer qu’elle est une économie pour tout le monde et qu’elle ne laisse personne derrière. 

Pour qu’elles le fassent, cela implique qu’il faudrait développer une stratégie et des politiques pour l’économie essentielle.  Au niveau de nos sœurs organisations africaines, il y a lieu qu’elles montent aussi des politiques et projets de réduction de la pauvreté afin qu’elles prennent des opportunités offertes par la démonstration que l’économie essentielle a faite.  Cela nécessite des créations et des innovations sur les manières de réduire la pauvreté fondées sur les vertus de l’économie essentielle. 

En résumé, mieux reconstruire l’Afrique après le Covid-19, c’est aussi mieux composer avec l’économie essentielle.   

 

L’économie essentielle et la connexion à l’essentiel local  (p. 6)

 

Comme toute économie, l’économie essentielle regorge des aspects positifs et négatifs.  En s’attelant sur ses aspects positifs, on peut citer notamment la connexion à l’essentiel local.  L’un des aspects positifs de cette économie est le recours et la revalorisation des ressources locales pour résoudre des problèmes locaux. 

S’agissant par exemple de la connexion à l’essentiel local, on a vu l’augmentation de l’intérêt aux installations locales ces derniers mois.  La plupart des personnes et familles ont tenté de connecter avec la nature locale, les parcs locaux et jardins publics, les magasins locaux, etc.   Alors que pendant la période d’avant le confinement, il y avait peu d’intérêts pour certains aux ressources locales.  Le local et l’essentiel sont ainsi devenus proches d’eux pendant le confinement. 

Les organisations africaines peuvent utiliser cet attribut de l’économie essentielle pour résoudre les difficultés que leurs usagers rencontrent en matière de réduction de la pauvreté.  Des difficultés qui sont de plusieurs ordres tels que les pénuries alimentaires, le manque d’accès aux produits de première nécessité, l’absence d’éducation essentielle, le manque de santé et de salubrité, le déclin de la connexion au local, ainsi de suite. 

On peut conclure que l’utilisation des aspects positifs de l’économie essentielle (tels que la connexion à l’essentiel local) par les organisations africaines peut avoir des effets bénéfiques pour la réduction de la pauvreté.

 

 

The Essentialness of the Poverty Reduction in Africa in the Age of Covid-19 (p. 7)

 

The quality of poverty reduction being essential is not only a matter of the usual known income poor people.  Indeed, having a poor health as a result of someone catching or being contaminating by Covid-19 is in itself a sign of poor health or poor sanitation.  This raises the question of the relativity or subjectivity of poverty rather than of the objectivity of it. 

An income rich person can also be a poor from the health point of view.  Covid-19 does not choose between the rich and the poor.  If this is the case, then it is essential to reduce any forms of poverty whether those who have been threatened by any of these forms are income poor or rich.  In this respect, Covid-19 is a reminder of the essentiality or essentialness of poverty reduction regardless of income status. 

For example, the essentialness of the poverty reduction in Africa in the Age of Covid-19 has gained its cause when rich and poor had to rely on the same essential domestic health systems and services as there were lockdowns everywhere.

In short, the essentialness of the poverty reduction in Africa in the Age of Covid-19 is about telling us the reduction of poverty (here sanitation poverty caused by Covid-19) is not only beneficial for the poor.  It is in everybody’s interest, rich or poor.

 

 

Care and Essential Economies That Help to Save and Protect Lives (p. 7)

 

One of the attributes of essential economy is that it provides space to care for others.  By only producing, consuming and using essential products and services, this shows that we care for others who also need the same goods, services and opportunities like us.  The other ones could be those in most needs, the ones who need more care and help in our society than anybody else.  In this respect, essential economy and care economy can intersect at certain point or area whereby essentiality could mean caring for others.

For example, one could have noticed during the lockdown how the store advertisement message of buying only what you need as essential was combined with the other message of caring for each other through social distancing rules.  This shows how close essential economy is to care economy.

Briefly, a caring and essential economy can help to protect and save lives, especially at this time of Covid-19 during which many lives are at risk. 

 

Sustainable Essential Economy and Poverty Reduction (p. 8)

 

Sustainable essential economy (SEE) is the absolutely necessary and sustainable management of available and scarce resources that can help to solve the basic economic problem of poverty and hardships.  SEE can help avoid the depletion and waste of natural resources while caring for the generations to come in terms of the resources which will be available for them.  In this respect, sustainability and essentiality go hand in hand as both can help to reduce poverty.

For further details and discussions on sustainable essential economy and poverty reduction, please contact CENFACS.

 

Essential Economy, Environmental Impacts and Poverty Reduction (p. 8)

 

Environmental impact is defined in the Dictionary of Environment and Conservation written by Chris Park (3) as

‘any positive or negative impact or effect that any activity, project and programme may have on natural resources and the environmental system’. (p. 152) 

Because of the nature of the essential economy, which is based on the essence of a thing and essential use of natural resources, the environmental impact from the essential economy can be lower than what one would expect, on what is extremely important and necessary. 

The essential economy will tend to use few natural resources and will stop waste.  This tendency can positively impact the reduction of poverty if poor people are able to save on the use of resources.  The saving made can help improve their essential gross domestic product per capita.

For any further discussion about the environmental impact of the essential economy, please contact CENFACS.

 

Survey on Essential Economy: Reconnection to the Essential Local (p. 9)

 

As part of its survey about people’s experience of using the essential economy during the lockdown, CENFACS is running a questionnaire for people to say what they think about their reconnection to the essential local in order to survive during the lockdown of the economy.

To take part in this survey and or to tell your feelings about your reconnection to the essential local, please do not hesitate to contact CENFACS.

 

 

The Essential Economy as the Economy that does Leave No-one Behind (p. 9)

 

Those who have only basic or essential solvable income can be left behind.  They may not have the disposable income to purchase goods and services at a certain price due to the income constraint. 

The Covid-19 and subsequent lockdowns have shown how those who live only on basic or essential monetary income could not even afford to cover the extra costs of disinfection and sanitation brought by Covid-19 in their household budgets.  The financial bailout of those poor in some parts of the world is in itself the evidence of the lack financial means due to the suddenly change of cost of living for them.

In idealistic world where everybody has a basic or essential income to live, they can at least afford to buy essential goods and services.  Because the essential economy is based on essential activities, it tends to be inclusive of everyone who is looking for essential goods and services like we have seen during the lockdowns.  This inclusiveness and embodiment of the essential economy makes no-one to lag behind in the fulfilment of the needs of sanitation and health products to fight the coronavirus pandemic for example.

Despite the asymmetrical effects of lockdown between people, the essential economy itself does not differentiate people unless those who are running this economy choose to do so.  This feature of the essential economy makes it as a lasting system of production, consumption and distribution of goods and services that connects people including the poor to what really is indispensable for their life and survival.  This takes away from what is non-essential for everyday life.

For any query or enquiry about the inclusivity of the essential economy, please do not hesitate to contact CENFACS.   

 

The Essential Economy as the Economy that Serves the Poor (p. 9)

 

Serving the poor, under-served and un-served could mean a lot of things.  In the context of this writing, it simply means helping them to get out poverty and hardships.  Again, helping someone to get out poverty and hardships could also mean different things to different people. 

Getting out poverty and hardships could mean creating the conditions that are favourable to them to use their abilities and talents to resolve the basic problem of the allocation of scarce and limited resources to unlimited wants and needs.

However, creating those conditions may not be enough if only few of those in need are the only ones able to access them.  To make those created conditions useful, it is good to widen the entry to many of them as well as to work with them so that they can have the essential tools, means and capacities to access the conditions and environment created for them.  This will help them to succeed in the process of getting the service they need to escape from poverty and hardships.

This is one of the many ways of serving the poor.  It is also helping them to help themselves.  Because the essential economy is also a caring one, it can serve them in this way without putting a plate, cutlery and a glass on the table for them.

For further details and discussions about how the essential economy can serve the poor, please do not hesitate to contact CENFACS.

 

“Essentia” Project (p. 10)

 

The “Essentia” project is a poverty-relieving initiative that uses the tenets and attributes of the essential economy in order to help people and communities in need to escape from poverty and hardships.  The project connects these people and communities to essential activities while motivating them to use non-polluting ways of resolving their long standing problems of poverty and hardships.

The project will be run by local organisations in Africa in alliance with CENFACS.

To support and or for full project proposals, please contact CENFACS.

For a paper copy and or enquiry about the 68th Issue of FACS, contact CENFACS.

 

(1) www.investopedia.com (accessed August 2020)

(2) Collins English Dictionary (2007), HarperCollins Publishers, Glasgow (www.collins.co.uk)

(3) Chris Park (2011), A Dictionary of Environment and Conservation, Oxford Press University, Oxford and New York

 

Help CENFACS keep the Poverty Relief work going in 2020.

We do our work on a very small budget and on a voluntary basis.  Making a donation will show us you value our work and support CENFACS’ work, which is currently offered as a free service. 

One could consider a recurring donation to CENFACS in the future.

Donate to support CENFACS!

 

FOR ONLY £1, YOU CAN SUPPORT CENFACS AND CENFACS’ PROJECTS, JUST GO TO http://cenfacs.org.uk/supporting-us/

Thank you for visiting CENFACS website and reading this post.

Thank you as well to those who made or make comments about our weekly posts.

We look forward to receiving your regular visits and continuing support throughout 2020 and beyond.

With many thanks.

 

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Track, Trip and Trending in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance

Welcome to CENFACS’ Online Diary!

05 August 2020

 

Post No. 155

 

 

The Week’s Contents

 

• Track, Trip and Trending in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance

• Mid-Summer 2020 Review and Update

• Happiness under the Constraint of Face Coverings

 

…. and much more!

 

 

Key Messages

 

• Track, Trip and Trending in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance

 

August is CENFACS’ Track, Trip and Trending month.

We do Track at CENFACS as we think that every one of us can undertake basic physical activity of running or racing to help reduce poverty. Our project known as Run to Reduce Poverty is designed to meet that end.

This Summer, we are going to do Social Distancing Track.  This is due to the coronavirus and its associated impacts and effects.

August is also the month we carry out some Trips to our projects. We visit our projects all over the year, but August is the time we highlight this. It is the month of the year we walk again and reach out to the need, to the people, communities, organisations and livelihoods in need.

This Summer, we are going to undertake Virtual Trips.  This is also due to the coronavirus pandemic and its associated impacts and effects.

We thirdly deal with Trending in August as we spend time looking at what we can call Trendy DevelopmentTrending in Poverty Reduction helps us to follow the direction of poverty reduction work. This August we are going to follow this direction via ‘Social’ and ‘Virtual World’ in reducing sanitation poverty and enhancing health and safety aspects of sustainable development.

Again, due the coronavirus pandemic and its related impacts and effects, we are going to follow this direction via online, video, phone, screen and digital technological means of communication rather than on papers (print) or physical visits.

This Summer has been all about Covid-19 and its impacts.  Therefore, we are going to integrate Covid-19 and the theme for Summer into these three activities of August as follows: Track, Trip and Trending in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance.

More details about CENFACS’ Track, Trip and Trending month for this year is given under the Main Development section of this post.

 

 

 

 

• Mid-Summer 2020 Review and Update

 

This is a review and update about what has been happening within CENFACS in terms of the running of activities, projects and programmes.  The review and update cover the period from the 1st of July 2020 until now and is divided into areas of work dealing with the CENFACS Community, Africa-based Sister Organisations and the two of them.

 

=> Areas of work dealing with the CENFACS Community

 

Regarding the CENFACS Community, we would like to mention the following.

We have reopened the Charity e-store while following to letter the restrictions and guidance related to the control of Covid-19 .

Our Covid-19 Campaign continues with the mantra of “STOP COVID-19 NEGATIVE IMPACTS AND SURGE”.

There are advisory sessions on holiday, happiness and healthiness budgets to be accessed by the community via an appointment.

We have unveiled our 6 Healthiness Projects for poor children, young people and families; projects that are run under the theme of a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance.

We have recently set up a Covid-19 Hub for Poverty Reduction as a point of collection and treatment of CENFACS’ work and information on Covid-19-induced poverty and hardships.

We held the 12th edition of our Summer Festival of Thoughts with a focus on Health Economics.  This festival was a wonderful and unique opportunity to look into the issue of Covid-19 as being at the same time an economic and health threat, especially as the world is the middle of the global coronavirus pandemic.

The above is not just a list, but it is what has been going on so far since the beginning of July 2020.  To find out more about this review and update, please contact CENFACS.

 

=> Areas of work dealing with the Africa-based Sister Organisations

 

Concerning the Africa-based Sister Organisations, we would like as well to keep you inform by stating the following.

We heard the African Voices about the areas of improvement in the work we do together as some of you have expressed it in our consultation related to All-in-one Impact Feedback.  Where possible and within our capacity, improvement will be initiated.  We will set up an improvement plan to that effect.

The survey about the impacts of Covid-19 shock is still running.  We are asking to those who have not yet responded to do so.  It is in our mutual interest to respond to the survey.

The Rebuilding Africa Advocacy has been held with a focus on rebuilding healthiness in the phases of low spread and growth of the epidemiological curves of Covid-19 in Africa.

Data Analytics and Impact Activities have been carried out as scheduled.  However, due to the delay in getting all the feedbacks or reports from various sections of CENFACS, we are a bit held behind compared to our initial plan.

The African Sahel Humanitarian Corridors Appeal (that is an appeal to end food insecurity, water shortage and income decline exacerbated by Covid-19) is now trending.

 

=> Areas of work with the CENFACS Community and Africa-based Sister Organisations

 

To both the CENFACS Community and Africa-based Sister Organisations, we would like to add the following to what is trending within CENFACS.

We are still working in making CENFACS’ 2020s Development Agenda, Poverty Reduction Programme and Tools Box Covid-19 secure.

Under the project known as African Children and Sustainable Development Goals (Generation Global Goals or 3G Project), we are as well continuing to work on the Impact Analysis of Covid-19 Shock on African Children’s realisation of climate and sustainable development goals.  

We have recently embarked on the Impact Monitoring and Evaluation of CENFACS’ 2019-2020 Humanitarian Appeals for Africa, which we conducted.

 The two parts of our Summer Programme (i.e. Appeal and Healthiness projects) are still running.   If there is any query about these projects and / or any of our projects, please contact CENFACS.

To support the Appeal projects, let CENFACS know at http://cenfacs.org.uk/supporting-us/

To access Healthiness projects, contact CENFACS at facs@cenfacs.org.uk and or by completing the comment form on our website.

We hope that this Mid-Summer 2020 Review and Update will give you a glimpse and the state of improvement of our activities, projects and programmes.  It is our way of keeping you informed and engaged around the Summertime.

We also hope that everybody is looking after each other in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance while enjoying the Summer weather.

For those who are in holiday during this Summer, we wish them a healthy holiday time.

For those who are working this Summer, we also wish them well with their work and whatever they are doing.

For those who are planning to go for holiday, we would like as well to wish them well with plans.

 

 

 

• Happiness under the Constraint of Face Coverings

 

Our Season of Happiness is still on track as we are trying to discuss and find answers about the difficulty that some members of the CENFACS Community are facing in covering the cost of buying masks or coverings, let alone the cost of hygienic and cleaning products to disinfect households.

The usual happy face with a smile that represents our Season of Happiness has been taken away by Covid-19.  Covid-19 has forced us to wear face masks or coverings instead of keeping our face and mouth free with a smile.  We are therefore asking the following questions.

What is happiness today in this context of Covid-19 adding more costs to our health budget while taking away our smile?

How can we find true enjoyment and joy with a smile under the Covid-19 restrictions?

What relieves better sanitation poverty: is it a face mask to protect us against Covid-19 or a smiling free face that gives us natural breath and a deep feeling of relief?

To discuss about Happiness under the Constraint of Face Coverings, please contact CENFACS

 

 

 

Extra Messages

 

• Track, Trip and Trending in a “Mission” Year and Project

 

As part of CENFACS’ “Mission” Year and Project and of the month of Track, Trip and Trending; we would like those who can and want to proceed with either of the following “Mission” Activities:

Social Distancing Run 2.5 miles (nearly 4 km) for the relief of sanitation poverty or just poverty this month

√ Undertake Virtual Visits or Tours of 3 projects or activities related to Covid-19 hit local people or communities

√ Do online search to find 6 Social Trends in health poverty alleviation and health-enhancing aspects of sustainable development

The above three types of “Mission” Activities are our way of linking our “Mission” Year/Project and the month of Track, Trip and Trending together.

To undertake any of the above mentioned “Mission” Activities, please let CENFACS know. 

CENFACS will be pleased if you could share with us, your experience in undertaking these “Mission” activities.

 

 

 

• Record your Summer Telling Moments to Report Back

 

Whether one has a Summer break or is working over this Summer, it is always a good idea to record your telling moments or just what you are doing.

After Summer, we often ask people or the community to report their Summer experience back.  If you record what you are doing this Summer, after Summer it will be easier to share what you may judge is a shareable part of your Summer experience or story. 

If you decide to record your Summer activities or experiences, please do not forget to take photos and pictures, make a video, record your voice, podcast etc.    It is also useful to write down dates, places and names of people involved in your projects or experiences.  You can plan the way you want to report back whether you want to use words or numbers or tables or graphs, figures, etc.

Reporting back your experiences can sometimes inspire others, especially if your experiences contain poverty-relieving elements.

We hope you will take our message of recording to report seriously.  Thank you any way!

 

 

• Integration or Factorisation of Covid-19 Impacts into Le Dernier Carré (the Last Square of Poverty Relief)

 

The Last Square of Poverty Relief (or le Dernier Carré) is CENFACS’ four step model of poverty relief that deals with four types of poverty: income poverty, consumption poverty, energy poverty and in-working poverty.  It is also the square of escape or inescapability from poverty, a four-dimensional poverty. 

Multi-dimensional poverty requires multi-dimensional approach to tackle it.  CENFACS’ Le Dernier Carré (the Last Square of Poverty Relief) model is an example of multi-dimensional approach to poverty reduction.  The model is mostly in action when using CENFACS’ League of Poverty Reduction as it enables to classify team countries according to their efforts in reducing poverty.   

Covid-19 and its associated impacts do not leave our four step model of working on poverty untouched.  We are looking at the best possible of integrating or factorising the coronavirus pandemic impacts into this model.  This integration or factorisation could mean taking into account sanitation poverty or health poverty in the Last Square of Poverty Reduction.

To find out more or get the progress about this process of integration or factorisation of Covid-19 into the Last Square of Poverty Reduction, please contact CENFACS

 

 

 

 

Main Development

 

Track, Trip and Trending in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance

 

Our thematic and working model of Summer of Healthiness in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance will continue this month through the three activities of

1/ Social Distancing TRACK to help reduce poverty

2/ Virtual TRIP to Covid-19 hit local people

3/ Online TRENDING in health poverty alleviation

 

• • Track, Trip and Trending 2020 Activities

 

(1) Social Distancing Track to reduce poverty in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance

 

This is delivered through the project Run to Reduce Poverty, Gaming to Reduce Poverty and Vote your African Manager of Poverty Reduction. These are All-year Round Projects or Triple Value Initiatives.

However, because of the weather conditions (sunshine) and nature of August (holidays time for many of our supporters) we put a particular emphasis on the Run aspects of these all-year round projects, over this month. 

This Summer, this emphasis has changed due to the coronavirus pandemic.  Because of that, one can only do physical run out and indoor if they respect the coronavirus guidance in terms of social and physical distancing rules.   

We expect those who sign up to the Run element to take actions and run it by themselves while following to letter the UK Government restrictions, the NHS advice and the World Health Organisations guidance.  After summer, they can report back to us or at any convenient time before the end of the year.

 

(2) Virtual Trip to the needs in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance

 

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, there are restrictions and travel bans about non-essential trips although some parts of the world are easing the lockdown.  For those who cannot physically visit projects on the grounds, arrangements can be made between the physical visitors and the organisations to be visited so that they can organise a virtual trip or viewing. 

This requires that the visitors and visiting organisations have the technology that enables this virtual tour to happen.  If this is possible we expect and advise our supporters to virtually visit some of projects and initiatives whether in the UK or in Africa during and around the month of August.  Because of the circumstances we are all in at this time of Covid-19, it could be a good idea if this trip can be done to Covid-19 hit areas, people and communities. 

Since we cancelled all non-essential physical trips, CENFACS All in Development Volunteers can do virtual trips.  These virtual trips can still help us to check if we are on the right track at helping to reduce poverty and at tracking our records for the work on the ground.

Because the theme of trending for this Summer is about Socials, we are going to link Trip to the need with social and virtual world.

 

(3) Online Trending in Health Poverty Reduction in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance

 

Due to the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent lockdown effects, it has been noticed that market economy has scaled back while the state economy and social economy have remarkably increased their size through the financial bailout and various socio-economic measures to protect the health systems and the economy. 

Additionally, there has been an increase in the ways of e-working, remote working, e-education and so on via the virtual world.  Because of that, we are going to add to our trending activity the virtual world. 

During this August we are dealing with online Trending in health poverty reduction by following the direction of Social and Virtual World and their capacity of lifting people out poverty. We mean by that we are following the direction of poverty reduction by using social.  This social can include: social media, social networking, social skills, social responsibility, social sciences, social distancing rules, etc.   

We will be observing what social and the social sector are doing to hep to reduce poverty and enhance sustainable development.  We will be looking at the extent to which social can be poverty reducer. 

We will be doing it while integrating the Covid-19 as it affects the way we are happy or not happy, we eat, we entertain ourselves, we pass our summer holiday, we dress, we socialise, etc. to reduce health poverty.

So, social and its respective impacts on health poverty reduction in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance are what will be trending at CENFACS, as given below.

 

• • August 2020 Trending Activities/Programme 

 

=> Week beginning: Monday 03/08/2020:

Social distancing rules as life saver and protector

=> Week beginning: Monday 10/08/2020:

Social networking as connector for poverty reduction and sustainable development

=> Week beginning: Monday 17/08/2020:

Social health as enabler for poverty reduction

=> Week beginning: Monday 24/08/2020:

Virtual world as a means to online interaction to reduce poverty

 

If you are interested in this trending programme, please share with us your experience or comments about it.

Further explanation about this August month’s activities can be obtained from CENFACS.

 

• • Socials as our Online Trending in Health Poverty Reduction in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance

 

In focus from Week beginning 03/08/2020:  

Social distancing rules as life saver and protector

 

With what is happening now with the measures against the spread of Covid-19, one can hope everybody understands what Social Distancing Rules (SDR) mean. 

SDR are simply the guideline to keep a safe space between non-members of the same household in order to avoid the spread of the coronavirus pandemic.  It is a disease control tactics.   SDR help to protect and save lives against the threats, harms, damages and dangers posed by the Covid-19.

As a life-protector, a SDR is a social and physical defence against the life-threatening and damaging impacts and effects of the coronavirus pandemic.  In this respect, the practice of SDR contributes to the maintenance of healthy conditions of life for all and specifically for the most vulnerable and people at risk of catching the Covid-19 disease.

As a life-saver, a SDR is a social and physical gesture that can preserve or rescue lives from the Covid-19 disaster.  In this respect, the practice of SDR is a way of taking care of each other in the difficult times of Covid-19.  By taking care of each other, this contributes to the prevention of mass life tragedy or fatality that can be brought by Covid-19. 

What is more is that SDR as life-saver can enable to stop the threat of extinction of a generation like the one we have seen with Covid-19 whereby the 65 plus generations have been the most vulnerable.     

In the context of our Online Trending in Health Poverty Reduction in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance, we are following the direction of health poverty through social distancing rules.  What does it mean?

It basically means that we are trying to observe how people are applying this rule (the social distancing rule) in order to either stop the spread of the coronavirus pandemic or escape from sanitation/health poverty. 

Indeed, one can look at how people are trying to comply with this rule in order to protect and save their own life and the life of others.  On can as well observe how the same people or other ones are trying to use this life-protecting and –saving rule in order to reduce or end sanitation/health poverty. 

The above is our trending activity for this week; activity which has already started. 

To follow with us the direction of sanitation/health poverty reduction via social distancing rule, please contact CENFACS.

 

Help CENFACS keep the Poverty Relief work going in 2020.

We do our work on a very small budget and on a voluntary basis.  Making a donation will show us you value our work and support CENFACS’ work, which is currently offered as a free service. 

One could consider a recurring donation to CENFACS in the future.

Donate to support CENFACS!

 

FOR ONLY £1, YOU CAN SUPPORT CENFACS AND CENFACS’ PROJECTS, JUST GO TO http://cenfacs.org.uk/supporting-us/

Thank you for visiting CENFACS website and reading this post.

Thank you as well to those who made or make comments about our weekly posts.

We look forward to receiving your regular visits and continuing support throughout 2020 and beyond.

With many thanks.

 

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Essential Highlights of Healthiness Projects

Welcome to CENFACS’ Online Diary!

29 July 2020

 

Post No. 154

 

 

The Week’s Contents

 

• Essential Highlights of Healthiness Projects in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance

• Happiness and Healthiness Budgets 2020 – Holiday Budget Deficit: How to Sustainably Manage Budget Deficit in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance

• The African Sahel Humanitarian Corridors Appeal Continues…

 

 

… and much more!

 

 

 

Key Messages

 

• Essential Highlights of Healthiness Projects in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance

 

Last week, we introduced the theme making the second part of our Summer 2020 Programme, part which consists of Healthiness Projects.  This theme is Healthiness in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance.

This week, we are giving essential highlights of the Healthiness Projects.  These highlights can be found under the Main Development section of this post.  The full details of these projects are also available on request from CENFACS, including ways of accessing and using them. 

To access and or support them, just contact CENFACS.

 

 

 

• Happiness and Healthiness Budgets 2020 – Holiday Budget Deficit:

How to Sustainably Manage Budget Deficit in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance

 

We are continuing our tips and hints on Happiness Budget by looking at holiday budget deficit.

A deficit is generally defined as the amount by which expenditure is greater than real income.  In terms of holiday budget deficit, it simply means that one’s holiday expenditure is more than holiday income.  It is a negative balance which could suggest that there could be a need to finance it (here holiday budget deficit). 

Yet, speaking about holiday budget deficit could seem bizarre since we are talking about poor people or those in need.  These are the people who often struggle to make ends meet.  They are the ones who often are short of money to tie the knots of the two ends of the month.  Despite that any sensible humans should do some budgeting, here holiday budgeting. 

Budgeting is forward thinking process that can help to coordinate the different areas of household life while defining responsibility and delegating powers within the same household.  It is indeed an instrument for household control as well as a basis for decision making process and changing plans where there is a need to do so.

We will be working on the budgeting process on the budgeting process with those who are struggling to make ends meet.  We will be working on how to avoid and sustainably manage holiday budget in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance. 

For those who are familiar with online tools, they can find countless examples of family/household budgets sometimes in the form of Microsoft Application Spread sheets.  For those who are not familiar with these free available online resources, they can use CENFACS’ line of financial advisory support.

With the particularity of this Summer during which the Coronavirus is still threatening lives, there is a need to take into account the Covid-19 in dealing with budget deficit.  So, we will be checking with them on which part of this deficit is attributable or not attributable to Covid-19.  This exercise enables to take into consideration the way in which Covid-19 is affecting their holiday budget in what they eat, drink, cover or uncover their body, entertain, shelter, etc.

To learn or seek support on how to avoid and sustainably manage holiday budget deficit or negative budget balance in Summer of Covid-19 dominance, please contact CENFACS.

 

 

 

• The African Sahel Humanitarian Corridors Appeal (The African Sahel Summer 2020 Humanitarian Relief Appeal by CENFACS)

 

Our Appeal for Humanitarian Corridors for the Peoples of African Sahel continues this week.  The Appeal is about asking to establish channels of communication and transportation for dispatching relief goods and services to the peoples of the African Sahel who are suffering from the lockdown effects.  It is about reducing the trade threatening and destroying effects resulted from the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent lockdowns. 

We understand that tough measures have to be taken to control the life-threatening and destroying impacts of Covid-19.  However, precaution has to be taken to avoid the situation in which one virus (here Covid-19) is being fought while the method used to fight it creates another virus which is even more deadly or claims more fatalities than the first one. 

As many humanitarian organisations on the grounds are pointing out, the African Sahel is moving from the coronavirus to the hunger virus.  Therefore, creating and sustaining humanitarian corridors to insure the supply of foods, drinks, medicine and other essential items in the African Sahel is life-saving act.

There is a possibility to help for this to happen.  There are ways of helping this to be achieved.  How?

One way of doing it is through the online and virtual technological means.  Indeed, when one speaks humanitarian people always think it is about asking money.  In this case, CENFACS is not asking you to donate money.  CENFACS is simply asking to use the same technology that helps many to e-work, to e-educate, to join a video conference meeting, etc. in order to challenge the adverse impacts of Covid-19, to create humanitarian corridors in the African Sahel. 

CENFACS is asking to those who can to use the same technology to reach those who have the key to the situation on the grounds so that humanitarian corridors can be open to safe lives in the African Sahel.

It is possible to use online and digital technologies to effectively communicate like many have brilliantly shown it during the lockdowns to distance work and stay connected to bring down the barriers of misery for the peoples of the African Sahel.    

Additionally, we always argue that to save lives one does not need to do grandiose things.  They can just do little things that create BIG IMPACTS.  Reaching out to those who have the keys to the situation on the grounds can be done via a mobile phone, video conference meeting, email, text messages, etc.  Seriously speaking, these are not a big deal; but they can have a BIG IMPACT such as saving lives from hunger and tragedy.

To support this Appeal or mobilise online resources to help, please do not hesitate to contact CENFACS.

 

 

 

 

Extra Messages 

 

• Feedback on Virtual Summer Festival 2020 (the Seven Days of Development in July 2020 Festival): Health Economics – How to make health economics work for the poor and neediest

 

Our Summer 2020 Festival of Thoughts and Actions is now closed. 

We would like to thank all those who made contributions.  Seven days were many days to think but if we want to do something about sanitation poverty and transform lives into healthy ones, we need more times and days to work.

We would like as well to apologise to those who wanted to attend or join our virtual sessions, but were denied the opportunity to interact with us through video conference meeting.  We hope that in the future, the technology will be on all sides to allow us to implement our virtual sessions as scheduled.  We are very sorry for the inconvenience caused. 

Although the Festival is closed, we would like to ask you again to provide a feedback about the experience you have had with it.  You could also say if you can, something about the previous Festivals so that we can improve the ways these days of thoughts and actions on poverty relief and sustainable development are prepared and run. 

As part of this improvement, this year we have tried to run virtual sessions, but we were unlucky that our plan did not go as thought.  Despite this setback, we managed to achieve our event aim and goals while re-communicating our anti-poverty message as usual.

We will continue to work with you to make our Summer Festival and future events of this kind as an opportunity for better change, for adding our thoughts and voices for the building of the world as a better place for everybody, especially for those in most need. 

Our feedback formula remains the same as for the Analytics month.  It consists of you using your own words and numbers to tell and share what you think of the Festivals.  We would like you to keep your freedom to tell us what you think. 

You can feedback via email at facs@cenfacs.org.uk and or by completing the comment form on our website. 

 

 

 

• All-in-one Impact Feedback: Only Two Days to Go!

Supporters’ and Users’ Experiences, and Africa-based Sister Organisations’ Voices

 

Our Analytics month of bringing light to what worked, what did not work and of measuring what we achieved in our last financial year is coming to an end in two days.  We are for the fourth time appealing to you to tell us in your own words and numbers your perceptions, feelings and experiences about the programmes and projects we ran in the last 345 days preceding the beginning of July 2020.

Although we have selected 12 initiatives for Impact Feedback One and 9 ones for Impact Feedback Two for monitoring and evaluation purposes, we are not expecting people to provide feedback on all of them.  People can only feedback on the project(s) and programme(s) they benefited from, supported, recommended users to us or interacted within.  We again suggest picking up ONLY 1 or 2 initiatives for feedback.

Please feel free to say what you experienced.  

Again, thank you for your experiential support!

 

 

 

• Summer 2020 Humanitarian Relief Appeal Projects

 

Our Summer 2020 Humanitarian Relief Appeal campaign is made of five projects, which are:

(1) Distress-free Life from Coronavirus in Africa

(2) All Gifts for All Coronavirus-affected Poor

(3) Iconic Young Carer for a Coronavirus-free Environment

(4) International Networking and Protection against Covid-19

(5) ‘Covid-19 Secure’ ELCLASSICO International      

 

We have already launched one of these Humanitarian Appeal Projects to support poor children, young people and families over this Summer of Covid-19 Compliance.  The launched project is the Distress-free Life from Coronavirus in Africa.

As a humanitarian reliever, Distress-free Life Coronavirus in Africa brings hopes and dreams to multi-dimensionally distressed children, young people and families in dire need of help in Africa by enabling them to move out poverty in the summertime and beyond.

You can donate any amount that you can afford to help relieve the continuing pressing needs in Africa at this time of Covid-19 Compliance.

To donate, just contact CENFACS at http://cenfacs.org.uk/supporting-us/

 

As far as the other four remaining Summer 2020 Humanitarian Relief Appeal Projects are concerned, we are conducting a project planning review for them.  This review is meant to integrate the coronavirus factor into them so that they can be Covid-19 proof.  Once this review is completed, they will be actively added to our Summer Humanitarian Relief Appeal campaign.

For enquiries about this review, please contact CENFACS.

 

 

Main Development

 

Essential Highlights of Healthiness Projects in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance

 

CENFACS Healthiness Projects include:  1) Healthy Summer Break 2) Holiday without Coronavirus 3) Summer Harmony with Nature 4) Hot Barriers against Covid-19 5) Networking for Protection and Safeguarding against Covid-19 6) Community Care and Health Responsibility for Covid-19 Control.

As argued last week, there is a link or relation between the six projects.  We can briefly present them one by one as follows.

 

1) Healthy Summer Break (Family Healthiness Mini-Guide)

 

Being healthy means running a healthful lifestyle to reduce the possibility or risk of getting disease.  Having a good rest over Summer can help achieve that. 

Healthy Summer Break (HSB), which is CENFACS’ Family Healthiness Mini-Guide, is designed to this disease-free healthful lifestyle to happen.  HSB is an effort to keep our diet, lifestyle, and ways of consuming goods and using services healthy.  It means healthy life in foods, drinks, hobbies, entertainment, etc.

To find out more and or get this Family Healthiness Mini-Guide, please contact CENFACS.

 

2) Holiday without Coronavirus (Holiday & Covid-19 Information Manager)

 

One of the concerns for many people and families is how to pass this Summer without getting infected by Covid-19; Covid-19 as a life-threatening disease and economic threat.

Holiday without Coronavirus or Covid-19 Information Manager is CENFACS’ resource that adds value to the health and hygienic support to the already known World Health Organisation guidelines, the UK Government’s rules and the NHS guidance on the protection against the coronavirus pandemic. 

This Covid-19 Information Manager helps to practise, comply and reinforce the exiting anti-coronavirus restrictions and measures in a user-friendly manner.  It is a Covid-19 compliant support in a user-friendly way.

For further details about this Covid-19 Information Manager, please contact CENFACS.

 

3) Summer Harmony with Nature (Summer Campaign over Nature)

 

Summer of Healthiness is also of accord with nature with its creatures.  Keeping a harmonious relationship with plants, animals, landscapes and surrounding natural species (like trees, plants, waters, parks, etc.) and resources adds a great value to our healthiness. In other words, it is about equating our needs of healthiness to those of the nature.

Living in harmony with nature means that we do not need another spike of Covid-19 outbreak or a lockdown to happen in order to be silent by the nature.  Humans can pre-emptively take the lead by keeping their relationships as harmonious as possible for future virus or lockdown not to happen.

 Need to keep harmony with nature, please do not hesitate to contact CENFACS.

 

4) Hot Barriers against Covid-19 (“Barrier-gesture” Project)

 

Since there is no vaccine or specific medicine against Covid-19, it is important to keep tight control of fences or barriers to stop or prevent the circulation of Covid-19.  Removing our elevated barriers against Covid-19 can open up the possibility of Covid-19 spikes within any community.

Hot Barriers against Covid-19 or “Barrier-gesture” Project is a life-saving and sustaining gesture for our own and public interest and goods.  Barrier-gestures (like physical and social distancing) must be kept elevated during this Summer as the Covid-19 threat is still around.

To find out further about this Healthiness Project, please contact CENFACS.

 

5) Networking for Protection and Safeguarding against Covid-19 (Covid-19 Social Media Platform)

 

It is not enough to carry out our individual actions against Covid-19 unless we sum up them by coming together in the form of social connections as human chains.  Such connections or network will help to exchange information and data for the mutual interest.

Networking for Protection and Safeguarding against Covid-19 or Covid-19 Social Media Platform is a means to access and facilitate the flows of information about the protection and safeguarding against Covid-19.  Through this means, one can receive and pass on protective and safeguarding information about Covid-19 within a networked community.

To network for protection and safeguarding against Covid-19, please let CENFACS know.

 

6) Community Care and Health Responsibility to Control the Virus (Personal/Family Healthcare Plan)  

 

Community Care and Health Responsibility to Control the Virus (CCHRCV) is a combination of the support to people to live with care and dignity in our community on the one hand, and our shared responsibility for the public health on the other.

Through CCHRCV, we will try to reduce lifestyle-induced diseases for ourselves and others while promoting our own health without adversely impacting the health of others and future generations.  Health care and responsibility imply as well whatever we do we must comply with Covid-19 restrictions.  For example, when we do physical exercising we must maintain Covid-19 restrictions.

We can use this Healthiness initiative to create a Covid-19 Proof Wellness or Healthcare Plan.  Such a plan will include the following: health vision and goals, lifestyles habits, follow-up tips and checks.

For further details about the CCHRCV, please contact CENFACS.

The above six interlinked ways/projects of creating and sustaining Healthiness in a Summer of Covid-19 Compliance are not an end for themselves.  They do not replace any good advice and practice (like the ones produced by statutory health organisations on Covid-19 matters).  They just add value to what it is already in place.  They are to be used in conjunction with the existing health and safety measures.

For further details about any of them, please do not hesitate to contact CENFACS

 

Help CENFACS keep the Poverty Relief work going in 2020.

We do our work on a very small budget and on a voluntary basis.  Making a donation will show us you value our work and support CENFACS’ work, which is currently offered as a free service. 

One could consider a recurring donation to CENFACS in the future.

Donate to support CENFACS!

 

FOR ONLY £1, YOU CAN SUPPORT CENFACS AND CENFACS’ PROJECTS, JUST GO TO http://cenfacs.org.uk/supporting-us/

Thank you for visiting CENFACS website and reading this post.

Thank you as well to those who made or make comments about our weekly posts.

We look forward to receiving your regular visits and continuing support throughout 2020 and beyond.

With many thanks.